(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Page 6 Magazine Issue 02"

NFflU 



ATARI 400/BOO 
COMPUTERS, ORIC, 
COMMODORE VIC. 64 
COMPUTERS 



c*»i 



fS& 



MOTf 



ALL ATARI, ACTIVISION. 
PARKER. APOLLO. 
IMAtilC, MATTEL A 
cOLttO CARTRIDGES. 



c £esT 







CBSC0LECOVISI0N- 

£149 

- INCREDIBLE GRAPHICS I 
EXPANDS INTO A FULL MICRO- 
COMPUTER SUPPLIED COMPLETE 
WITH DONKEY KONG ! 



MSHtCK 



COMMODORE 

64/VIC 

SOFTWARE 



call 



pOft 






RFflnr 



LOTS AND LOTS OF ATARI 
Zaxxon, 



SOFTWARE. E.g. 

Nautilus, Jumbo Jet Pilot. Apple 
Panic, Centipede, Miner 2049er, Slime. Intruder. Alien 
Swarm, Preppie, Pacman, Mathpack, Choplifter Rom, 
Soccer!, Airstnke Rom — plus man y, man y more 
tit las — Call now for our latest batch of detailed brochure) 
We will keep you up to date on all the new software 
releases HI- Upgrade to 32K/48K today I 



ON 

ATARI 

COMPUTERS 



WE SERVICE All JLTMI& 

CUMMQ3CFIE COMPUTERS 

SERVICE DEPT: 

061-236 3395 



JKDkKL 



FAST NATION WIDE 1 
MAILORDER 
ON ALL 

PRODUCTS. 



OF 
CO' 



RANGE 
CHESS 



H%& s 



\H 






50 Newton St.,0H Piccadilly Manchester Ml ZEA Tel: 061 -236 3083/ 7259 




ATARI VCS 
COMPUTER 
KEYBOARD 



CONVERTS YOUR ATARI INlfO A ft£AL 
COMPUTER } CALL HOW FOR Ot TAILS ! I 




ATARI aOOTYPEWRITER 

KFVRnflBD NOW .N STOCK AT 
naLL NOW FOR DETAILS !!) X 



7995 



GAMES & SOFTWARE 
CLUB 



We are extending our library with the 
very latest Atari 400/800 games as they 
become available. This will increase our 
comprehensive range of programs avail- 
able for hire to members at a most com- 
petitive rate. 

If members request a program we do 
not have and we consider it suitable we 
will endeavour to obtain it. 

Apply now and hire your 
FIRST TWO GAMES FREE. 



For full details send s.a.e. or phone any 
evening 7 p.m. -TO p.m. or at weekends. 

GAMES & SOFTWARE CLUB, 

35, Tilbury Road, 

Thorney Close, Sunderland, SR3 4PD 

Tel. 0783 286351 



Your friendly 
Pro fessional 

Printer- 




YEARS 




i 



1883-1983 

Birbeck and Song Ltd. 

26*2$ Fleet Street * Birmingham B31JY 
0212364602 



CONTENTS 



ISSUE 2 



FEB/ MAR 1983 



EDITORIAL 4 

NEWS c 



LETTERS 

FOUR IN A ROW. , /"-V.V.V.V." Mike Aston 

JOYSTICKS...... Jeff Woodward 

GTIA— TUTORIAL Phil Griffin 

FEATURE REVIEW— ASTRO CHASE 

SILLY CIRCLES Mike Aston 

PLAY YOUR CARDS . , Les Ellingham 

GTIA TEXT WINDOW Colin Boswell 

REVIEWS ..16&22 

DISK DIRECTORY. Colin Frisian 17 

TINY TEXT .....^..StanOckersand JimCarr 18 

GETTING STARTED. ... Les Ellingham 24 

FIRST STEPS 25 

CLUBCALL.. ... . 26 



6 
7 
9 
10 
12 
13 
14 
15 




Editor Les Ellingham 

Editorial Offices Tel. 0785 41153 

Printed by Bi r bee k & Sons Ltd. 
Published by ABACAS 



PAGE 4 is a U*ers magazine and relies entire^ on readers 
support in suhmi tting articles and programs. The aim is to 
esplor-e At*n computing through the exchange of information 
and knowledge and we cannot unfortunate! v pay for articles 
published* Me hope you Hill gain satisfte tton tram setinq 
your work published and in turn we hooe you will learn from 
article* submitted Uy other readers. 

Whilst we take whatever steps ue cm to ensure the accuracy 
of articles and programs submitted *nd the content of 
advertisements, PACE & cannot be held responsible for any 
error-s or claims mad* by advertisers. 



Subscriptions to PAGE 6 are 
available from; 

PAGE 6, 18, Underwood Close, 
Parkside, Stafford, England 

Subscriptions cover 6 issues 
(1 year) 

U.K £ 4.00 

Europe— Airmail £ 7.00 

U.S. A.— Surface £ 7.00 

U.S.A. — Airmail .... .. £14.00 

Elsewhere — Surface £ 7.00 

Elsewhere — Airmail £15.00 

Single copies (U.K. only) 70p 
inc, p. & p. 

Cheques etc, payable to 
ABACUS 

PAGE 6 is published bi-monthly 



t 



TM 




ATARI ""is a registered trademark 
of Atari, he. All references 
should be so noted 



J 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



NEW DIRECTIONS 

Well, the response to Issue I was very 
gratifying. Thanks to all those of you 
who took the time to write in with 
letters* articles or programs - keep 
them coming. My apologies if there have 
been delays in answering your letters, 
it has been quite hectic. As stated in 
Issuti I, Che magazine was sparked off by 
the formation of the Birmingham User 
Group but the response from outside the 
group - even from abroad - has been so 
great that it has been decided that the 
magazine should be run as an independent 
entity. PAGE 6 will keep close ties with 
BUG and you will see their page in every 
issue but in order to reflect the 
interest shown from all around the U.K., 
che magazine will now be published by 
ABACUS - an independent User Group, the 
Around Britain Atari Computer Users 
Society. ABACUS will be modelled on the 
Independent National BBC User Group, 
LASERBUG In that its prime function will 
be to publish a magazine which will act 
as a forum for the exchange of ideas and 
information. It is hoped that PAGE 6 
will encourage existing User Groups and 
individual users all over the U.K. - and 
abroad - to dig a little more deeply 
into their Atari computers and share 
their knowledge so that we may all both 
learn and teach. There is something new 
to learn each day in the world of Atari 
- perhaps with computing you continue to 
learn forever! I will try to share my 
enjoyment through the pages of PAGE 6, 
why don't you do likewise? 

WHAT CAN YOU DO? 

You can help in many ways even if you 
are only just beginning. Write in to the 
magazine with any thoughts - send in 
articles or program listings. If you 
can't manage that, then just write to the 
advertisers asking for details of their 
products - even buy something I We need 
their support as well. 

One of the most exciting programs I 
have seen for a long time Is TINY^TEXT 
featured in this issue. It opens up new 
horizons for 'serious' use of your Atari 
at minimal cost {nothing 1 .). Get to grips 



with It and start sending cassettes to 
your Atari friends and to PAGE 6. 

Some of the people who have phoned or 
written in have asked whether it is 
possible for them to be put in touch 
with other users in their area. If all 
the Atari User Groups could give me 
details of their activities and meeting 
places I will be happy to publish them 
and hopefully encourage new members. I 
can't of course give out people's names 
and addresses without their permission 
but again 1 am happy to start up a 
Contact page if you would like people to 
get in touch with you. If you can find 
a like mind there is no better way to 
learn and perhaps you can then share the 
fruits of your fertile new partnerships 
with other readers. This is a Users 
magazine and can only survive with User 
support. Let me know what you want to 
read or, if you have any special talent, 
write about something you really enjoy 
and together we can produce a really 
special magazine., 



i r= irsti t =l I =irzir=ir=lK=if*=ir ="=i'=i'=i'=i'=t<=*'=>t=*i 



Midland Games Library 



4B Re^cJ Way Bishops Cleave Cheltenham GkwcestorshiipJ 



A comprehensive library of cassettes, 
cartridges and disks. 

Scores of games and adventures etc. for 
you to hire for your Atari Home Com- 
puter. All games are originals with full 
documentation. We guarantee no copied 
games. 



For full details send s.a.e. to: 

MIDLAND GAMES LIBRARY 

48, Read Way, Bishops Cleave, 
Cheltenham, Glos. 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



News 



First news of the Atari 1200 seems to 
be good news for 800 owners. The only 
reported Improvements so far are that 
the 1200 has 64K and four programmable 
function keys- On the other side of the 
coin, the 1200 has only one cartridge 
slot and 2 controller ports. This 
obviously means that Atari have 
abandonded any plans to bring out 
software for that second slot, but then 
there are an awful lot of 800' s about 
and maybe some enterprising independent 
software house will bring out a 
cartridge which will run on the 800 and 
not the 1200- Atari's arguetnent for 
reducing the number of game controllers 
seems to be that there is not enough 
software around that needs to use 4 
joysticks. One interesting thought 
though is that several people are 
beginning to develop printer interfaces 
that can be easily (and cheaply) 
connected to the existing 4 game ports. 
Could it be that these will not work 
with only 2 game ports and you will 
therefore be forced to buy the 850 
interface once again? At something like 
£200 more for the 1200, one wonders why 
it is being brought out, but then maybe 
there is more inside, just like there is 
more in the 400' s and 800' $ than the 
manuals would have you believe. 

On the software front Atari have 
suddenly become very busy again. After 
what seemed to be a long while without 
any new games, Atari are now bringing 
out the arcade games in force. Galaxian 
has already been in the shops for 2 
weeks and Defender should be available 
by the time you read this. Also in the 
pipeline in Qix although that may be a 
couple of months, On the serious side 
there should be a Microsoft Basic in ROM 
quite soon and also File Manager, 

Chopllfter, reviewed in the last issue 

should be available on ROM quite soon, 

so no need to buy that disk drive after 
all! 

In the rumours department ... , watch out 
for a 3 inch Micro Drive at the end of 
the year and four-colour 



plotter-printer at only £1501 

Atari have now come closer to sorting 
out the problems in repair delays by 
setting up a network of service centres 
around the U.K, Your local retailer 
should have a leaflet but if not, phone 
Atari on Slough 
nearest centre. 



<07S3) 24561 for your 



There's quite a buzz on the home front 
now as far as software goes. Apart from 
the new Adventure International 

mentioned last Issue, watch out for U.K. 
written software from Liverpool based 
MlcroSpot who hope to bring out a new 
game each month and a new series of 
Adventure games from Channel 8 
Software, These promise to be of 
interest to those of you who have not 
upgraded, being 16K machine code 
adventures In the Scott Adams style, but 
written specifically for the Atari and 
featuring Display List Interrupts to add 
a bit more life to the text display. 
Expected to retail at £14.95 

The new MicroNet service, heavily 
advertised in the computer press is 
expected to bring out an Atari 
compatible modem soon but no details yet 
of what software support can be expected. 



Graphics... 



5 REM *** SIMPLE GTIA DEMO *** 
10 GRAPHICS IB : SET COLOR 4 f I,5 
15 C=@ 

26 X=0:Y=0 

22 X1=79:Y1=0 
25 X2^7?:Y2=19l 

27 X3=0:Y3=19 1 
30 A=l 

58 PLOT X,Y:DRANT0 X1,Y1 

6d DRAWTO X2,Y2: DRAWTO X3,Y3 

70 DRAWTO X,Y 

SB COLOR X+C 

90 X=X+A:Y=Y+A:X1=X1~A 

100 Y1=Y1+A:X2=X2-A:Y2^Y2-A 

110 X3=X3+AiY3=Y3-A 

12B IF X**40 THEM C=C+2:GOTO 20 

130 GOTO 50 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



Input 



Dear Sirs, 

Firstly, congratulations 
on the magazine and good 
luck for the future. 

1 have a question which 
I hope you can answer, I 
recently had to break off 
in the middle of a long 
program and CSAVEd what I 
had onto two different 
cassettes. When I 

attempted to re-enter 

however, both showed an 
error of the Serial Bus 
type, one immediately and 
the other after about a 
minute of normal sounding 
operation. Is there any 
way 1 can salvage the 
section of the program 
prior to the error or must 
1 re-do the whole thing? 
T,C. Mayers 
Leicester 

**There is no easy way to 
recover a program which 
won't load. it should be 
possible to write a 

program that can read data 
as it is received and 
perhaps one of our readers 
can come up with one. 

A program is recorded on 

tape in three seperate 

steps. Firstly a 20 

second leader of mark tone 

followed by any number of 

data records and finally 

and EncHof-File record. 

If the computer does not 

get to the End^of-Flle 

record you will end up 

with an error. There seem 

to be many problems with 

CSAVEIng and CLOAMng 

programs so a few hints 

may be helpful. Firstly, 

clean the tape heads 

REGULARLY with any 

proprietary tape head 

cleaner. Before CSAVEing 

any program, type LPRTNT 

followed by RETURN. 

Ignore the error message 

and then CSAVE. This helps 



initialise the cassette 
handler properly. If you 
have problems in loading, 
try starting the tape a 
little further on or 
back. Try also moving the 
tape past the point which 
uill not load by just 
timing on the cassette 
motor by POKEing 

54018,52. Press SYSTEM 

RESET and try again. If 
readers know of any other 
hints let us know, 

Dear Page 6, 

I received issue 1 of 
PAGE 6 and was suitably 
impressed. I enclose my 
subscription. 

I am a relatively 
in-experienced computer 

freak and any short 

programs like 'line 

lister' I find a great 
help. A few thoughts on 
items I am sure your 
readers will find useful - 
a conversion to Atari 
Basic of commands used by 
other computers to allow 
programs to be converted - 
useful parts of memory 
maps for the same purpose 
- an explanation of 
machine code - listings of 
other machines which use 
the 6502 processor - a 
list of User Groups in the 
U.K. - a list of useful 
addresses in the U.S. A - a 
possible breakdown in 

variables used in programs 
to help in understanding 
what's going on - a 
suggested reading list of 
books for novices - fault 
finding in your programs - 
and a simple adventure 
game - 

I realise I am expecting 
quite a lot but these are 
some of things that are 
not covered in the books I 
have read and are the sort 
of things which most people 



would like to be able to 
find easily. 

J, Dimmer 
Elgin 

**Wowl We will start work 
on some of these but this 
is a Users Magazine so 
there are a few ideas for 
readers to submit articles 
on. Lets hear from you 
for the benefit of other 
readers. 

Dear PAGE 6, 

Thank you for the first, 
issue of the magazine, its 
just what we Atari owners 
need In this country. 

If you live somewhere 
like I do where the 
availability of software 
and accessories Is 

virtually non-existent, a 
magazine such as yours 
that keeps you up to date 
with the latest 

developments is most 

welcome . 

Having to buy programs 
mail-order without seeing 
them first can sometimes 
be quite frustrating! 

Considering the wealth of 
software available Is it 
possible for you _to 
squeeze In a few more 
reviews ? . . . Please ! 

D, Beech 
Hull 

**Thanks for your kind 
remarks. We will try to 
review all kinds of 

programs both old and new 
and if any readers feel 
they can write reviews of 
programs that they have 
and are very familiar with 
please let me know. It is 
difficult to give in-depth 
reviews on programs which 
you only have a couple of 
spare hours to look at! 












Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



Four in a Row 



16 K 



Mike Aston 



Pit your wits against the computer or 
an opponent in this simple to play but 
difficult to master game. If you are 
feeling really lazy> just sit back and 
watch the computer play itself! 

The object is simple > just get Four In 
a* Row, that is four blocks of your 
colour either vertically, horizontally 
or diagonally whilst trying to prevent 
your opponent from doing the same. 

Enter each players name when prompted 
or if you wish to play the computer, 
enter * as the second player. To watch 
the computer play itself, enter * for 
each player's name. Good luck! 



1 REM ****XX*MK****XmM*XM**X*X* 

2 REM * FOUR IK A ROW S 

3 REM * MIKE rtSTON * 

4 REM a************************** 
16 DIM NAM£l*<8) t NflME2*i8) .NAMES (8) 
20 DIM LINE(7) 

38 FOR 1=1 TO 7sLlNEtI>=6:NEXT 1 

40 DIM TAB<7,6) 

56 FOR 1=8 TO 7:F0R J- 8 -TO 6:TAB(I,J)- 

0:NEXT J: NEXT 1 

80 FOR l=J TO 7rLlNE(D=6;NEXT I 

n 50=1 

188 GRAPHICS 2 

110 POSITION 12,5:? tt6;CHR*< 1 19) :F0R I 
=1 TO 5B:NEXT 1 :P0SITI0N 9,5:? #6;CHR* 
( 198) 

115 FOR 1=1 TO 99jNEXT IMPOSITION 12,4 

I? ttitCHRSUll) :FQR 1=1 TO ?9:NEXT I :P 
OSITION 11,5:? H6;CHR*< 193) 

128 FOR [=1 TO 99:NEXT I '.POSITION 12.3 

:? #6;CBR*U14) eFQR 1=1 TO 99:NEXT I :P 
OSITION 12.2:? W6;CHR*<210) 

125 FOR 1=1 TO 99:NEXT IMPOSITION 11,4 

:? #6;CHR$al0) iFOR 1-1 TO 99;NEXT I:P 
OSITION 11,3s? #i;CHR*(2I3) 

138 FOR 1=1 TO 99JNEXT I POSITION 18,5 

:? *6;CHR$U85) :FGR 1=1 TO 99;NEXT I:P 

OSITION 18,4:? tt6:CHR*<287) 

148 POSITION 8,8: PRINT #6; "FIRST PLAYE 

RS NAME" t INPUT NAME1* 

158 POSITION 0,9:PRINT #6;CHR*< 1 15) ;CH 

R*(10i);CHR*<99) ;CHRS(ilI) ;CHR*U18>;C 

HRSUeB);" '; 



152 ? #6;CHR*(112> ;CHR*U08) ;CHR$<97> ; 

CHR*<121) ;CHR*<101) jCHR*C114) ;CHR*U15 

) . » « . 

154 ? #6;CHR*< 118) ;CHRS(97) sCHRt< 189) ; 

CHR*< 181) 

168 INPUT NAME2* 

388 GRAPHICS 7 

385 POKE 559,8: REM TEMPORARILY DISABLE 

SCREEN 
318 COLOR 3 
315 GOSUB 18808 
328 SETCOLOR 4,8,7 

325 POKE 559, 34; REM RESET SCREEN THEN 
DRAW INITIAL BOXES 

338 PLOT 42.9;DRAWTQ 42,78jDRAWTO 157, 
7&:DRAWTQ 157,9:DRAWT0 43,9:DRAWTQ 43, 
6? 

348 PLOT 156,9iDRAWTQ 156,78 
358 FOR Y=10 TO 68 STEP 18 

369 FOR X=44 TO 148 STEP 16 

370 PLOT X T Y:DRAHT0 X+ 15,Y:DRAWT0 X+ 15 
,Y+9:DRAWT0 X,Y+9:DRAWT0 X,Y 

338 PLOT X+l f Y+l:DRAHTQ X+l.Y+8 

399 PLOT X+14,Y+1:DRAWTQ X+l4,Y+8 

400 NEXT X:NEXT Y 
4 10 FOR 0=1 TO 2 

428 COLOR C:X=CC-1)*14:XP11*X+11 
430 FOR Y=9 TO 69 STEP 3 
440 PLOT X,Y:DRAWT0 XP11.Y 

450 PLOT X,Y+1:DRAWTQ XPJ1,Y+1 
468 NEXT YjNEXT C 
465 SETCOLOR '3, 0,8 
478 POKE 87,1 

486 FOR l=i TO 7: POSIT I ON 4 + 2*1,1:? H6 
;CHR*( 144+ n :NEXT I 
490 POKE 87,7 

580 IF 00=1 THEN NAME*=NAflE 1* 
516 IF G0=2 THEN NAME*=NAME2* 
520 GOSUB 788 

538 IF NAME*= h, K' 4 THEN GOTO 4080 
540 PRINT "YOUR GO ■ ;MAHE* 
550 PRINT 
568 TRAP 620 
578 INPUT COLNO 
588 IF C0LN0<1 THEN GOTO *26 
598 IF C0LN0>7 THEN GOTO 626 
688 IF LINE(C0LN0)=8 THEN GOTO 628 
618 TRAP 48680 
615 GOTO 1000 
628 ? "TRY AGAIN ■ sNAME* 
638 GOTO 558 
788 Y=9+CT*3 

719 X=<G0-im4iXPn«X+ll 
728 FOR ^Y~l TO 7 STEP -1 
738 COLOR GO: PLOT X,U:DRAWT0 XPU.U 
748 COLOR 8: PLOT X,U+2:DRAWTQ XPll,U+2 
758 NEXT U 
768 COLOR GO 

778 FOR M=6 TO 1 STEP -1 
788 PLOT X,U:DRAWT0 X+11,V „....over 



■—^ 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



8 



798 NEXT U 

898 FOR M=X TO 28 

816 COLOR GO: PLOT V+ 12, 1 :DRAHTO U+12,3 

828 COLOR 6: PLOT U f l!DRAWTQ V,8 

838 NEXT K> 

343 RETURN 

1889 LINEtCOLNO)=LlNE<COLNO)-l 

1016 Y=11+L1NE(C0LN0)*18 

1629 X=<, COLNO- D* 16+46 

1630 FOR U=28 TO X- 1 

1640 COLOR GG:PLOT U+ 12, 1 sDGAWTO V+12, 

3 

1656 COLOR 6: PLOT U,lsDRAWTC U,8 

I960 NEXT M 

1670 FOR V=l TO Y-l:MP3=V+8 

1680 I-UP8-10S1NTCUP8/10) :IF IO0 AND 

I<>9 THEN COLOR GO i PLOT X,VP8:DRAWT0 X 

+l!,VP9 

1096 I-U-10SINT(M/I6i iIF IO0 AND K>9 
THEN COLOR 6: PLOT XA'iDRAWTG X+11,V 
1100 NEXT V 
1 190 TAB ( COLNO , LINE < COLNO) ) =GO 

1260 wiN=e 

1218 GOSUB 2886 

1226 IF WlN~i THEN GOTO 1568 

1386 IF GO=l THEN 00=^2: GOTO 588 

1318 IF CT=28 THEN ? "DRAWN GAME" :GQTG 

1518 
1328 G0=1:CT=CT+1;G0T0 588 
150 G ? NAHEf ;" IS THE WINNER" 
1518 ? :? "DO YOU WISH TO PLAY AGAIN? 

Y/N* ; 

1520 INPUT NrtME* 

1530 IF NAMEtO-Y* AND NAME*<>"N* THEN 
GOTO 15 18 

1540 IF NAME*="Y" THEN RUN. 
1558 GRAPHICS 2+16 

156& - J U} "600DBYE"s? #6:^ #6; ll THANKYQ 
U FOR PLAYING" 

1570 FOR 1=1 TO 268;NEXT I J END 
2060 X=COLNO 
20 10 Y=LINE(XJ 
2628 N0=1 
2100 X=X-1 

2110 IF X-8 THEN GOTO 2288 
2128 SG=TAB(X S Y) 
2136 IF SQOGQ THEN GOTO 2268 
2158 NO=NO+i 

2168 IF N0=4 THEN W1N=1: RETURN 
2178 GOTO 2188 
2288 X=COLNO 
2300 X=X+i 

2310 IF X~8 THEN GOTO 2488 
2328 SQ=TAB(X,Y) 
2336 IF SQOGG THEN GOTO 2468 
2358 NO=NO+1 

2360 IF N0=4 THEN WIN=ltRETURN 
2370 GOTO 2380 
2468 X=COLNO:Y=LINE(X) :ND=1 

2508 Y-Y+l 

2516 IF Y=6 THEN GOTO 2668 



2520 SQ=TAB<X S Y) 

2538 IF SQOGD THEN GOTO 2608 

2546 N0=N0+1 

2558 IF N0=4 THEN W I N= 1 ; RETURN 

2566 GOTO 2560 

2600 X-COLNO:Y=LINE(X) :N0=1 

2788 Y=Y+1:X=X-1 

2718 IF X=8 OR Y*6 THEN GOTO 2868 

2720 SQ=TAB(X,Y) 

2730 IF SQOGO THEN GOTO 2866 

2748 NO=NO+1 

2758 IF N0=4 THEN WIN=1: RETURN 

2768 GOTO 2788 

2800 X=COLNQ:Y=LINE(X) 

2900 Y=Y-1:X=X+1 

2918 IF X=8 OR Y<0 THEN GOTO 3060 

2920 3Q=TAB(X,Y> 

2930 IF SQOGO THEN GOTO 3660 

2946 NO=NO+1 

2958 IF N0=4 THEN WIN= 1 : RETURN 

2960 GOTO 2988 

3008 X=COLNO:Y=LINE(X> ;N0= 1 

3188 rs=Y-l:X=A-l 

3118 IF X=8 OR Y<8 THEN GOTO 3268 

3128 SQ~TAB<X,Y) 

3138 IF SQOGO THEN GOTO 3286 

3148 NO=NO+ 1 

3158 IF NQ=4 THEN WIW^lsRETURN 

3168 GOTO 3180 

3280 *=CGi_NO: i'-LihE' - ■ 

3380 Y-Y+l sX=X+i 

3318 IF X=3 OR Y=* THEN GOTO 3480 

3326 3Q=TABlX,Y> 

3338 IF SQOGO THEN GOTO 3466 

3346 N0=N0+1 

3350 IF N0=4 THEN WIN=1:RETURN 

3360 GOTO 3380 

34 «0 RETURN 

4806 C0LN0=1 

4602 IF L1NE( COLNO' -8 THEN 4036 

4004 L INE ( COLNO > =L INE>: COLNO J - 1 

£1686 TABC COLNO > L INE <CGINQ)>=G0 

48 10 GOSUB 2600 

4616 TAB< COLNO S L INE < COLNO) >=0 

48 18 L I NE ( COLNO) =LINE< COLNO) + 1 

4826 IF WIN=1 THEN GOTO 1666 

4030 COLNG=COLNQ+ 1 

4648 IF C0LN0<8 THEN GOTO 4602 

4180 STCOL=GO 

4280 IF 60=1 THEN G0=2tGOT0 4228 

4210 G0=1 

4228 C0LN0=1 

4222 IF LINE< COLNO) =6 THEN GOTO 4258 

4224 LINE(C0LN0>-LINE(C0LN0)-1 

4226 TAB ( COLNO, L I H£i COLNO) )=G0 

4238 GOSUB 2080 

4236 TAB < COLNO , L I NE < COLNO) ) =8 

4233 LINE<COLNO)=LINE(COLNO)+1 

4240 IF WIN=1 THEN G&=STCOL:GOTO 1080 

4250 COLNO=COLNO+ 1 

4268 IF C0LN0<8 THEN GOTO 4222 

GOTO 17 












Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



Joysticks... 

Jeff Woodward 

All you 'arcade* game players out 
there must agree Chat a more sensitive 
joystick would be a boon to our game 
playing enjoyment. I have found that 
the standard Atari joystick starts to 
lose Its 'reaction 1 on certain types of 
game that require FAST and true 
responses from the stick. I can bring 
to mind playing Asteroids and pushing 
the stick forward to fly my spacecraft 
round the screen only to find that I am 
totally out of control and whizzing (or 
should that Hyper-warping?) all over the 
screen. Alternatives that have he en 
introduced up to now I have found very 
much the same, I can think o f LE STICK 
which I think would eventually give you 
Rubik's Wrist in five easy movements 1 I 
also find with the standard joystick 
that it also gives you hand fatigue 
after extensive play. There are two 
general positions in which the right 
handed player can hold the stick. 
Grasping the stick handle in his right 
hand, he can either hold the base in his 
left, or put the base on the table ur 
floor and use his left hand to steady it 
against a flat surface. In either case, 
while the left hand is trying to keep 
the base steady, the tight hand Is 
jerking the stick around in order to 
register the press. The effect of this 
Is that the right hand is always trying 
to tear the base from the grasp of the 
left. Since the right hand has the 
leverage of the stick working for it, 
the left must work much harder to steady 
the base, all the while holding it in an 
awkward position. The fatigue that 

results is nature's way of telling you 
to turn the T,V. off I Also note that I 
have been talking about RIGHT HANDED 
people only. All you lefties must get 
to be ambidexterous real quick - Atari 
never thought of you'. 1 have seen the 
K-Byte Stick Stand but I personally 
believe this gadget will soon become 
known as the 'Stick-Breaker* , 

In ANALOG magazine Issue 5, a guy 
wrote In showing how you can wire up a 
push button controller just like the 
original Asteroids controllers on the 
arcade machines and he said it worked 



equally well on Space Invaders. The 
problem Is I do not know where you can 
buy the input plugs but the rest of the 
hardware he describes is easily 

obtainable. Can any reader help? 

I have not tried the new 'Trackball' 
controllers but at over £50 each, there 
must be a cheaper way to play games, 
What about someone coming up with a 
project for a joystick or controller, I 
am sure we would all be Interested? 



ORIGINAL ADVENTURE . . . A FOOTNOTE 

The author Robert A. Howell has recently 
written to me and has stated that anyone 
interested in huying this program direct 
from his house can do so. He will send 
you a copy off for 422.35 (about £13.50) 
including Air Mail postage, If you send 
him an International Money Order, His 
address Is :- 

Ro he r t A , Ho we 1 1 , 
20, Richmond Road, 
Hudson, NH 03051, 

U. S, A 

This is for the 32K tape version. 

CHANGING COLOURS 

When you have a long listing to type 
in, do you get fed up with the 
'standard 1 blue screen and black border 
with white characters? Well here are 
two POKE'S that will change all that. 

Before you start typing in that magic 
program, type, in the 'Direct Made*, 
i.e. without using a line number, POKE 
710, n where n represents any number from 
to 255, This will set the main screen 
colour to whatever you wish and make the 
characters anything from black to 
Experiment until you find a 
suits you. Then type POKE 
n is the same number as 
a screen all of the same 
some other number for a 



Invisible I 

colour that 

7l2,n where 

before for 

colour or 

contrast. No more strain on the 

Choose your own favourite colour I 



eyes: 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



10 



GTIA Modes 



Phil Griffin 



When the basic Manuals were written the 
Atari computers were capable of only 9 
graphics modes (Modes to 8) available 
directly from Basic. With the 

Introduction of the GTIA (George's 
Television Interface Adaptor) chip to 
replace the old CTIA chip, the computers 
now have the added facility of Graphics 
MDdes 9 f 10 & 11. This fact is 
reasonably well publicised but there's 
not a lot of literature around to tell 
you how to use these modes. The object 
of this article is to give a brief 
explanation of what the 3 extra graphics 
modes are capable of and how to use them. 

All 3 modes have a resolution of 80 
horizontal points (0 to 79) by 192 
vertical points (0 to 191), They all 
respond to PLOT, DRAWT0 and XIO (fill) 
instructions. Although modes 9 and 11 
are relatively straightforward to use , 
mode 10 is a little more tricky. 



10 GRAPHICS 9 

28 FOR 1-0 TO I5:C0LGR 1 :F0R J=J TO J* 
10; PLOT 0,J:DRAWTO 7? t J:NEXT JsNEXT I 
iee GOTO 100 

PROGRAM 1 



5 REM S* CYLINDERS II ** 
10 Y1=120:Y=58 
20 GRAPHICS 9: FOR X"58 TO 
1=XjA=]:B=15;C=1:G0SUB 101 :A 
-1:G0SUB 1B0:Y=Y-10:Y1*Y1+10 
30 FOR K=l TO 3: FOR 2=0 TO 3 
^ZjBiFOR T=l TO 1090JNEXT T 
XT KiGOTO 10 

100 FOR K~A TO B STEP CrKl=K 
HEN Kl=12 

118 COLOR 15-KsPLQT Xl,Y-2-K 

X U Y+ K 1/3: COLOR K;PL0T XI ,Y 

AWT0 Xl,ti+Kl/3iXl=Xj+l:NEXT 

PROGRAM i 



STEP -10:X 
= 15:B=1:C= 
:NEXT X 
; SETCOLOR 
;NEXT 2:NE 

fIF K>I2 T 

1/3:DRAHT0 

+1+K1/3:DR 
K: RETURN 



GRAPHICS MODE 9 

In this mode you are able to plot 
points in a single 'line' with up to 16 
variations in luminance (brightness) 
which is ideal for 3-D light and shade 
drawings. The default colour setting 
for the background is black and the 
luminance of the points to be plotted is 
set with the C0IOR command (COLOR to 
15) immediately prior to plotting. 
Plotting in COIOR effectively plots 
the background colour (black) while 
COLOR 15 plots in white. Running 

Program 1 will show the range of 
luminances available. 



Program 2 Is a modified version of the 
'cylinders' program which appeared in 
Issue 1 of PAGE 6 and is Included as a 
demonstration of the effects available 
with mode 9, You will see that the 
overall colour of the display can be 
altered by using the SETCOL0R command 
(SETC0LOR 4, (hue) ,0). The 'hue' is 
selected from the range of 16 colours 
available and the values to set the 
"hue 1 are shown In Table 1. 



GRAPHICS MODE 11 

In many respects this mode is the 
opposite of mode 9. You are able to 
plot points In any of the 16 'hues' but 
at a single selectable luminance. The 
colour is set with the COLOR command 
(COLOR to 15) immediately prior to 
plotting the points. Substituting 

'GRAPHICS 11' for 'GRAPHICS 9' in 

• 

program 1 will show the range available 
in default colours (see table 1). 
Plotting in COLOR again effectively 
plots in the background colour (black). 
The luminance of the colours displayed 
can be altered by using the SETCOLOR 
command (SETCOLOR 4,0, luminance). The 
values for the luminance setting are 
even numbers between and 14. 

GRAPHICS MODE 10 

This is the tricky one. Graphics mode 
10 is capable of producing 9 colours on 
the screen at the same time, each at a 
different luminance. Unfortunately not 
all of these colours can be called 
directly from Basic by the COLOR and 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



11 



SETOOLOR commands and in order to use 
the full colour capabilities* you need 
to be familiar with how the SETCOLOR 
command works within a color register. 

The SETCOLOR statement contains 
Specific references to a colour 
register, a 'hue' and a luminance for 
tflat hue. The computer then converts 
th^s information into a memory location 
for the color register and a single 
value for the hue and luminance 
selected. This value is then 

automatically r poked 1 into the color 
register memory location. The basis for 
calculation qtf the value to be poked Is: 



POKE value = 
luminance value , 



( * hue * value 



16)+ 



Table 1 shows the range of values that 
the 'POKE 1 value can have together with 
the equivalent hue and luminance figures. 



REGISTER SCREEN DEFAULT VALUES MEMORY 
NUMBER COLOUR HUE LUM LOC. 

8 Orange 2 8 768 

1 Aqua 12 10 79? 

2 Blue 9 4 716 

3 Light red A 6 7ii 

4 Black 8 8 712 

TABLE 2: COLOUR REGISTERS 
WITH DEFAULT VALUES 



Instead of using a SETCOLOR Statement, 
its possible to by-pass the Basic 
commands and POKE a combined colour 
value directly into the color register 
memory location. Some examples of 

direct ' POKEs r with their SETCOLOR 
equivalents are shown below. 



POKE 



SETCOLOR 



COLOR HUE 


; VALUE 


LUMIf^NCE 


: POKE 


(HUE) (SETCOLOR) 


<EVEN 


(EVEN 






MALUES) 


VALUES) 


Black-white 


8 


I 


-. 


14 


8 


- 14 


Gold 


1 


8 


- 


14 


16 


- 38 


Orange 


2 


8 


- 


14 


32 


- 46 


Red 


3 


8 


- 


14 


48 


- 62 


Pink 


A 


8 


- 


14 


6A 


- 78 


Violet 


5 


a 


- 


14 


88 


- 94 


B! ue-purple 


6 


8 


- 


14 


96 


- 118 


Blue 


1 


8 


- 


14 


112 


- 126 


Light-blue 


8 


8 


- 


14 


123 


- 142 


B1 ue-green 


9 


8 


- 


14 


144 


- 158 


Aqua 


18 


8 


— 


14 


168 


- 174 


Green-blue 


11 


8 


- 


14 


176 


- 198 


Green 


12 


8 


- 


14 


192 


- 286 


Yel low-green 


13 


8 


- 


14 


288 


- 222 


Orange-green 


14 


8 


- 


14 


224 


- 238 


Orange 


15 


8 


- 


14 


248 


- 254 



708,34 " 

710,142 

712,52 



SE. 0,2,2 

SE.2,8,14 

SE.4,3,4 



TABLE 1 - SETCOLOR VALUES 
AND EQUIVALENT POKE VALUES. 



The Atari computer uses 5 color 
registers (0 to 4) within its operating 
system and these have default settings 
as shown in Table 2. 



You should now have a reasonable idea 
of how to set the colour within a color 
register by POKElng a value directly 
Into the register memory location. 

If you now substitute 'GRAPHICS 10 1 for 
'GRAPHICS 9' and '8' for '15' in line 20 
of program 1 you will find that the 
screen contains 4 coloured bands. These 
correspond to COLOR statements 4 to 7 
and show their default colours* The 
program has in fact drawn 9 bands of 
colour but 5 of them are set to the 
default colour of black. The position 
is summarised In Table 3. 

You can see from Table 3 that the only 
way to alter the colours plotted In 
COLOR statements to 3 is to POKE 
values directly into the memory 

The other COLOR 

have their colours 

the SETOOLOR command, 

keep to the 

Goto 13 



locations shown. 

statements can 

changed by using 

but its probably better to 

POKE Instruction throughout. 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



12 



Feature Review 



ASTRO CHASE 



32 K Disk/Cass. 1 Player 



Fernando Herrera was the first winner 
of Atari's annual 'Star Award 1 for a 
program he wrote for his little boy 
called My First Alphabet, Most of you 
will have heard of the program but many 
will not have seen it as it is only 
available on disk due to the fact that 
it has to access a large number of 
pictures throughout the program. The 
idea is very simple - just show the 
letters of the alphabet accompanied by 
pictures which represent those letters. 
Sounds as if anyone can do it, doesn't 
it? The secret of Mr. Herrera 's success 
though is an exceptional talent for 
graphic composition and a skilful mind 
in structuring the program to achieve 
the desired result. 

With his $25,000 prize in his pocket 
Fernando promptly set up First Star 
Software Inc. and took a crash course in 
machine language. Now, writing an 

alphabet program out of love for his son 
is one thing, but to write a successful 
arcade game to launch a new company is 
surely something else. Ibes he succeed? 
Take a look at ASTRO CHASE and you will 
find that the answer is an unqualified 
' Ye s ' . 

The scenario is that the Megard Empire 

has surrounded the earth with a force 

field and placed pulsating Mega Mines 

which are slowly advancing on the earth. 

Your mission is to destroy all the mines 

whilst fighting off the Megard saucers. 

Sounds familiar? Sounds just like the 

sort of blurb that poor programmers use 

to dress up their latest Space Invader 

variation, but ASTRO CHASE is very 

different. It begins with an excellent 

blast-off animation to take you into 

space from where you see the earth, 

complete with a map of North and South 

America, surrounded by various other 

planets. You can't see the force field 

but it is there preventing you from 

straying too far. There are eight types 

of enemy fighters at the various levels 

but your real task is to destroy 16 mines 

which are slowly but surely making their 

way towards earth, Fernando has invented 

something he calls 'Single Thrust 



Propulsion 1 which means that you can set 
your craft in motion and it will carry 
on in that direction whilst you fire in 
any direction around you I It takes some 
getting used to but is a great joy once 
you get it right. Each of your craft 
will use up energy but there are energy 
posts at the limits of the available 
universe if you can get to them and 
' shield r bases to give you up to 10 
seconds of protection from enemy fire. 
The enemy saucers are not too difficult 
to destroy but the real problem is 
bumping into a 'hot star* whilst being 
pursued. These are tiny pinpoints which 
don't do you any damage as such but 
which you can get stuck on and so 
destroyed by a pursuing enemy craft. 

The graphics on this are quite 
stunning but Fernando has gone much 
further and crafted a game in which he 
appears to have thought of everything. 
There are 34 levels, but if you are good 
you can start at any level up to 24 , So 
as not to spo"il the fun the higher 
levels can only be obtained by 
completing level 24. The best feature 
to my mind however and what sets this 
apart as an exceptional arcade game is 
that every 4 levels you come back to 
earth for a rest and each time can enjoy 
an animation sequence which adds a 
little more to the previous one* I get 
bored with arcade games which just give 
you points and more points but finding 
out what the next animation sequence Is 
going to be has got me absolutely 
hooked.' I have only managed it to level 
20 and 1 fear that I will not improve so 
if somebody gets up to the Master levels 
let me know what happens. 

The game has excellent graphics, 
scrolls, has music which automatically 
turns itself down while you are 
fightingl or which can be turned off and 
surely marks a big step forward in game 
design, First Star Software has set 
itself a big task to follow this but if 
they can do It they stand a chance of 
becoming THE Atari Software house to 
avidly watch in the future. 



i 






Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



13 



SILLY CIRCLES 



Mike Aston 



Explore the Atari Display 
this shape changing program. 

it works. 



Lists with 
He re ' s ho w 



n 



LIKE 10 - establishes a standard display 

list for mode 7. 

LINES 20 to 60 - draw a circle. 

LIKE 100 - sets the pointer to the 

display list. 

LINES 150 to 250 - change the display 

list a line at a time from the standard 

A * colour mode with 96 vertical rows to a 

4 eolour mode with 192 vertical rows on 

a full screen. This effectively halves 

the height of the circle producing an 

elliptical shape. 

Try changing LINE 150 to Z=-l, or 
Z=-2, or Z=-3. 



Add more colours to the circle or 
change the original shape. You could 
also try starting off in a different 



GTIA. 

COLOR 



8 
1 
2 
3 

4 
5 

6 

7 
8 



. Cont. 

SETC0LOR 
REGISTER 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

6 

1 

2 

3 

4 



DEFAULT 
COLOUR 

BUCK 

Black 

Bl ack 

BUtK 

Orange 

Aqua 

Blue 

Light red 

Black 



HEM0RY 
LOG. 

704 
705 
70o 
767 
708 
70? 
719 
711 
712 



Note: Memory location 764 controls the 
background colour 

TABLE 3: COLOR STAETEMENTS 
IN GRAPHICS MODE 10 



graphics mode but don't forget to make 
LINE 10 specify the mode with the 
largest RAM requirement that you are 
going to use . 



5 REM **** SILLY CIRCLES 


**KS 


6 REM XX by 


XX 


7 REM XXXX MIKE ASTON 


o*x 


8 REM 




10 GRAPHICS 7+16iC0L0R 1 




28 DEG :CX=80 :CY=40 sL=3? 




38 FOR 1=1 TO 340 




48 X=CGS( I)*L:Y=SIN< I ) XL 




58 PLOT CX+X,CY+Y 




69 NEXT I 




196 DL1ST=PEEKC560>+PEEK<561)X 


256+4 


150 2=1 




280 FOR 1=2 TO 96 




210 p=peek<:dlist+i) +z 




220 POKE DLIST+I ,P 




230 NEXT I 




240 Z=-2 




258 GOTO 200 




308 END 





instructions. , 

3) The plotting of points using the 
relevant COLOR statements 

That really concludes this 

introduction to the warld of GTIA. The 
addition of the new graphics modes gives 
Atari users even greater flexibility in 
their approach to graphics displays. In 
particular , Graphics Mode 10 opens up 
the possibility of high speed colour 
animation simply by moving colours 
through the colour registers. Finally, 
don't be afraid to experiment with these 
modes. You can't do any harm to the 
computer If you make mistakes* but you 
can learn an awful lot. If you come up 
with some interesting graphics displays 
using these modes send them In. 



In summary then, graphics displays 
using mode 10 require the following 
steps, 

1) The selection of the colours 
required . 

2) The setting (at some stage In the 
program) of each selected colour to Its 
own COLOR statement by using POKE 



Just to give you a starter In the 
possibilities of animation try making 
these changes to program 2 - LINE 20 

'GRAPHICS 



change 



'GRAPHICS 9 r to 
change 'GOTO 10' 



to 'GOTO 



LINE 30 

and add line 200;- 

200 P=PEEK(708): POKE 708,PEEK( 709) : 

POKE 709,PEEK{ 710): POKE 710, PEEK(711) : 

POKE 7ll,PEEK(712):POKE 712, P: GOTO 200 



10'. 
200' 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



14 



Play Your Cards 



Les Ellingham 



One of the more simple games to 
program would seem to be a card game but 
if you are just starting to learn Atari 
Basic the task may not be as simple as 
it seems. In this article I present you 
with a pack of cards for you to turn 
into whatever game takes your fancy. 

Graphics 1 would seem to be the ideal 
choice for a card game using the control 
characters representing the card suits 
but unfortunately there is not enough 
room on the screen to feature sufficient 
cards. This program uses Graphics and 
so looses the option of colour for the 
*pips' but does allow up to ten cards on 
the screen, 

Let's go through the listings. The 
first listing creates the pack of cards 
and in LINKS 50 - 75 goes through the 
entire pack to allow you to check that 
everything is alright* You can add 
Listing 2 later as an example of how to 
deal the cards. 

LINE 10 - Dimensions strings. At holds 

the entire pack whilst the CARD strings 

hold individual cards to be picked by 

random routines in listing 2, 

LINES 20 - 25 fill the strings with the 

same characters. In the case of AS the 

'pips' are poked in later. 

LINE 28 opens the Keyboard for direct 

input later in the game . 

LINES 30 - 35 set some colour and put a 

title up while the program creates the 

cards in the routine beginning with LINE 

400. 

LINES 400 - 490 are the T card-making T 

routine . 

LINE 410 goes through the 52 cards and 

first reads the CARDN0 from the DATA 

which Is the number of 'pips' on each 

card. 

LINES All - 414 change the characters 

from hearts to clubs to diamonds to 

spades, Refer to Appendix C of the 

Basic Manual, 

LINE 420 reads the position of each 

•pip* and places the appropriate 

character In the correct place in the 

string . 

LINE 440 Restores the DATA for each of 



10 DIM A*<3276) ,CARD1*C63>,CARD2*<63> , 

CARD3*<63) ,CARD4*<63) , BACK* (63) 

2B At(i)=" ":A*<3274)=" " iA*(2)=A*tREM 

INVERSE YIDEG SPACES 
25 SACK*< 1>- H K' :BACK*<63j = '#";BACK*<2) 
=BACK*:REM INVERSE UIDE0 tt 
23 OPEN #l,4,e,"K; u 

38 SETC0LOR 2 , U ,4:SETC0LQR 4, 11, 4: SET 
COLOR 1,11.15:P0KE 752,1 
35 ? CHRSC125) iPGSITION 12, 18 J? "PLAY 
YOUR CARDS" 

4a G0SUB 460:? CHR*< 125> 
50 REH GO THROUGH THE CARDS 
55 FOR CARDS=8 TO 51 

68 FOR 1=1 TO 9:P0SITI0N 0,1-ii? A*(CA 
RDS*63+ 1*7-6, CARDS*63+I*7> sNEXT 1 
65 CARDS- INT <RMX8>*52+1:> ilF CARD3=CAR 
D2 OR CARD3=CARD1 THEN 65 
78 FOR 0=1 TO 100:NEXT D 
75 NEXT CARDS 
3?S END 
400 CARDNO-1 

110 FOR 1-0 TO 5UREAD CARDN0:F0R J=l 
TO CARDNO 

411 IF K13 THEN 3UIT= 123:G0T0 428 

412 IF K26 THEN SUIT= 144: GOTO 420 

413 IF K39 THEN SUIT-224:GGT0 420 

414 SU1T=251 

420 READ A:A*(A+I*63,A-U*63:>=CHR*<.SUIT 

) 

430 NEXT J 

443 IF N12 OR J=25 OR 1=38 THEN RESTG 

RE 

450 NEXT I 

468 FOR 1=18 TO 4? STEP 13 

461 FOR K=0 TO 2 

465 FOR J=l TO 2 

470 READ A,B:A4ai+K)*63+A,a+K>K63+A) 

=CHR*(B) 

474 NEXT J 

475 NEXT K: RESTORE 540 
480 NEXT I 

490 RETURN 

500 DATA 1,32, 2,11,53,3,11, 32,53,4,?,! 

3,51,55,5,9,13,32,51,55 

510 DATA 6,9,13,38,34,51,55,7,9,13,30, 

34,32,51,55,3,9,13,13,30,34,46,51,55 

520 DATA 9,9,13,23,27,32,37,41,51,53,1 

0,9,13,13,23,27,37,41,46,51,55 

530 DATA 2,9,55,2,9.55,2,9,55 

540 DATA 18,282,54,202,10,209,54,289,1 

8,203,54,203 



the four suits. 

LINES 460 - 480 step through the 11th, 
12th and 13th cards of each suit to add 
the letters representing the court cards. 

The program then goes back to line 50 to 
run through the pack. 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



15 






J 

I 



There's your pack of cards. Now add 
listing 2 to see how these can be dealt 
out. The program picks k random numbers 
to represent four cards and makes sure 
that you don't have two cards the same. 
Each card Is made up of 63 characters 
and these are picked out of AJ at the 
appropriate point and put into the CARD 
strings. These are then printed out 
line by line at set positions on the 
screen to give you your 'deal' , 



58 REM % DEMONSTRATION BLACKJACK DEAL 

55 CARD 1=INURND< 8) *52+ 1) 

62 CARD2=INT(RND(0)*52+1) :IF CARD2=CAR 

Dl THEN 60 

65 CARD3=INT(RND( 05*52+1) :IF CARD3=CAR 

D2 OR CARD3=CARD1 THEN 65 

70 CARD4=lNT(RND<e:>*52+l> :IF CARD4=CAR 

D3 OR CARD4=CARD2 OR CARD4=CARDJ THEN 

70 

75 CARD 1 $=A* < CARD 1363-42, CARD 1* 43) 

80 CARD2*=A*< CARD2* 63-62 ,CARD2* 63) 

35 CARD3*=A*<CARD3S 63-62, CARD3S 63) 

90 CARD4$=A*(CARD4X 63-62, CARD43 63) 

100 FOR 1=1 TO ?: POSIT I ON 0,1-1:? CARD 

1*( 1*7-6, IS?) :NEXT I 

118 FOR 1=1 TO ?:P0SITI0N 8,I-li? BACK 

S< 1*7-4,1*7) jNEXT I 

120 FOR 1=1 TO ?:P0SITION 0,1+?:? CARD 

3*< 1*7-6,1*7) :NEXT I 

130 FOR 1=1 TO ?:PGSITION 8,1+?:? CARD 

4*(I*7-6,I*7) :NEXT I 

140 POSITION 2,21 1? "PRESS PNt KEY FOR 

DEALER'S CARD' :GET #1,K 
158 FOR 1=1 TO ?:POSITIGN 8,1-1:? CARD 
2*( 1*7-6 ,1*7) jNEXT I 
160 POSITION 2,21:? "PRESS ANY KEY FOR 

NEXT DEAL ' :GET *U,K 

170 ? CHR*U25>:G0TQ 50 

What you do now is up to you 
blackjack* poker, snap (I) or whatever. 
Add scoring, a money pot, anything you 
wish. If you can make up a good game 
send it in for a future article- 



CAN YOU... 

write an article ? 

send a program ? 

COPY DATE 25th MARCH 



GTI A Text Window 

Colin Bos we 1 1 

One slight disadvantage of the GTIA 

modes 9, 10 & 11 is that you can't 

easily mix text with your graphics 
displays. 

With this short program you can now 
add a standard text window to these 
modes. Most of what is happening 1b 
shown in the REM statements and you 
should be able to quite easily build up 
your own programs incorporating these 
routines. 

5 REM LET'S SET UP FOR A TEXT AND GTI 
A GRAPHICS MODE 
10 FOR M=9 TO U:G0SUB 1000 
15 REM PUT SOMETHING ON THE SCREEN 
20 FOR Y=0 TO I5:C0L0R Y:PL0T 0,0 
30 DRAWTO 60,Y3(10:NEXT Y 
35 REM NOW LETS SHOW OFF OUR NEW TEXT 
WINDOW 

40 ? "THIS IS GRAPHICS " jM 
50 FOR T=l TO 1B0:NEXT T 
6% NEXT M 
9?3 END 

??? REM M CONTAINS THE GRAPHICS MODE 
1000 IF M<9 OR M>11 THEN 1030 
10 10 REM READ IN THE DISPLAY LIST ROUT 
INE 

1020 RESTORE :F0R X= 153-5 TO 1554:READ 
A:P0KE X,A:NEXT X 

102S REM SET UP DISPLAY LIST FOR GR.3 
WO FIND THE BEGINNING OF THE DISPLAY 
LIST 

1030 GRAPHICS 8:Dl=PEEK(560)+PEEK(56l) 
*254 

1032 REM FIND THE LINE THAT LIES BEFDR. 
E TEXT AREA AND INSERT DISPLAY LIST IN 
TERRUPT 

1035 DL-DL+ 1<S6: POKE DL,143 
103? REM ENABLE INTERRUPT STARTING AT 
PAGE 6, SET BITS 6 + 7 FOR GTIA QPERATI 
ON AND TELL O.S. WHAT MODE TO WORK IN 
1040 POKE 512,0 SPOKE 513,4:PQKE 54286, 
l?2iP0KE 623,(M-8)*64jF0KE 87,10 
1045 REM DIFFERENT VALUES FOR D1FFEREN 
T MODES ! 

1050 SETCOLOR 4,0,0: IF M*ll THEN SETCO 
LOR 4,0,4 
1070 RETURN 

1080 IF M>24 AND M<28 THEN M=M-16:GRAP 
HICS M: RETURN 

1085 REM DATA FOR D.L.I. ROUTINE 
1090 DATA 72,173,27,208,41,43,141,10,2 
12, 141,27,208, 16? t 9 , 141 ,26,288, 104,44 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



16 



Product Reviews 



VICTAGRAPH PLOT WINDOW 

Whilst: the Atari Is capable of 
excellent graphics displays in modes 7 or 
8 there is no denying that It is a 
laborious task Indeed to get a picture 
fiom paper to screen. The traditional 
way would be to trace the original 
drawing and then transfer to graph paper, 
finally either numbering the squares on 
the graph paper or counting along to find 
the plot position. Anything that can 
make this task easier must be worth 
looking at. The best answer of course 
is to use a digitizer. The only one 
generally available at the moment is 
Versa Writer but at £169 you need to do 
an awful lot of drawing to make It worth 
while. The Victagraph which retails at 
£7.00 won't take away the chore of 
finding all those Plot and Drawto points 
but it does make the job much easier. 
The Victagraph is described as a Plot 
Window and comes as four sheets of 
plastic measuring 17 inches by 12 
inches. One is a white base sheet, two 
are see-through sheets with scales of 
320 horizontally by 200 vertically and 
the final sheet is a clear mask with 
sights at each corner which enable you to 
plot and read off points. You may not 
think that that is a lot for £7 but there 
has been no attempt to use cheap 
materials, the plastic is of a very heavy 
gauge and the printed scales very clear 
and professionaly done, It comes In a 
protective cardboard sleeve which even 
the most heavy handed postman could not 
damage 1 There are tvn pages of 

instructions which are written in a 
friendly way although they do seem to 
make the use of the device seem more 
complicated than It really Is. To use, 
you merely place a drawing on the base 
sheet, overlay a plot window and then 
use one of the sights on the window mask 
to go round your drawing and read the 
horizontal and vertical co-ordinates for 
each point. Once you get used to it, 
reading off points is very easy and very 
fast. You would probably be persuaded to 
try some fairly complex designs in 
Graphics 8 to which the scales are 
Ideally suited. It can cope with the 



other Graphics modes with either a 
smaller drawing or by scaling down. 

The Victagraph certainly makes picture 
drawing easier. Don't be mislead, you 
still have to figure out the Plot and 
Drawto points but it definitely beats 
tracing and counting up graph squares. 

COMPUTER GAMING WORLD 
MAGAZINE 

COMPUTER GAMING WORLD is a 48 page 
glossy American magazine which has just 
celebrated its first year hut has only 
just become available over here. It Is 
distributed in the U.K. by Games 
Workshop. 

Games Workshop are heavily into Dungeons 
and Dragons and Wargamlng and it might 
be expected therefore that Computing 
Gaming World will reflect similar 
interests. It does. Its content 

consists almost entirely of reviews - 
all written by readers - but these are 
not the normal half page game 
descriptions you find in most magazines, 
but full length, in depth, discussions 
of game design, strategy and tactics. 
Would you believe a three and one third 
page review of Chris Crawford's new 
game, Legionnaire? Tfo st of the strategy 
type games currently available are 
written for the Apple but Computer 
Gaming World has a surprising amount of 
interest to the Atari owner. Reviews 
are broken down into three categories. 
Mini reviews which metely give you a 
brief description of what you can expect 
to see in the near future , Micro Reviews 
which are more like the normal magazine 
reviews and Feature reviews which really 
go to town like the review of 
Legionnaire. The current issue 

<Dec/Jan> has 29 mini reviews of which 8 
are Atari but then most of the Apple 
ones will soon be available on Atari, 
four Micro Reviews of Atari games, the 
review of Legionnaire and a full article 
on how you can change Eastern Front if 
you don't like the way it plays'. In 
addition to all that, the next issues 
will feature a regular Atari column. 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



17 



DISK DIRECTORY 

Colin Friston 



t 



One of the most common uses for DOS on 
your disks is no obtain a directory of 
the contents. How many of us can 
remember all the file names we make up? 
DOS on every disk will take up 81 
sectors but here is a program that will 
give you a directory on screen or on the 
printer at a cost of only 8 sectors per 
disk. 

I usually file as "DIR" so that it can 
be accessed simply by RUN "D: DIR*" . The 
program opens an IOCB to the disk drive 
directory and runs between lines 40 and 
60 getting all directory entries. At 
the end of file the program traps to 
line 90 and gives an optional printout. 
A trap to line 100 is included to cover 
the printer being out of commission. 
The program is a fast way to recall and 
record what is on each disk without 
having to go into DOS, 

Next issue I will show yuu a Master 
Directory which will give you a catalog 
of all your disk entries, 



i rem m*KK*s***Ko*mm**m** 

2 REM * DISK DIRECTORY X 

3 REM * by * 

4 REM K COLIN FfUSTQN * 

5 REM £*S*£*£******£KS*m***K*K3* 

6 REM 

18 DIM A*<28> ,B*<28) :TRAP 78:QPEN #1,6 
,g,*0tX.X" 

29 GRAPHICS 8;P0KE 752,1:P0KE 712, 176: 
POKE 718,176j? ■ DISK NUMBER DIR 
ECT0RY" 

30 ? M MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMKMMMMM":RE 
M CONTROL M TO UNDERLINE 

49 INPUT #UA* 

58 P=P+i:IF P-21 THEN POKE 92 ,28: POSIT 

ION 28,3 

68 ? A*s GOTO 43 

78 CLOSE HI: POKE 82,2:0PEN 1*2,4,8, 'K»* 

88 POSITION 8,23 i? » HIT Y FG 

R PRINTOUT "r:0E* *2.K:IF K<>3? T 

HEN 178 

98 TRAP 108:LPP-INT ;G0TG 1 18 

158 POSITION 7,23:? 'PRINTER DOES NOT 
RESPOND ["isFOR 7=] TO lt388:NEXT T:G0T 
38 

118 TRAP j*8:0PEN 41,6. 8, B D:*,*" 

128 LPRINT iLPRTNT " +* 

NUMBER 

138 LPRINT : ^* DISK DERECT0 

Ri XX'sLPRINT 

148 «*"■' ":B$'"- ": INPUT *M ;A*,8*:LPRIN 
T A* .; ■ : ; B* 

158 GOTO 148 

168 LPRINT A*;" " ;B* 

170 CLOSE HliCLOSE H2s GRAPHICS 8 



COMPUTER GAMING WORLD . . . Cont. 



If your gaming interests lie in the 
strategy field or you prefer to exercise 
your ' thinking 'ability rather than your 
reflexes then Computer Gaming World Is 
well worth £1,95 every two months. 
Quite apart from being an interesting 
read, you will get more out of your 
existing games and will have a much 
better idea of what to buy as your next 
piece of software. No other computer 
magazine that I can think of will give 
you reviews of such depth. Games 

Workshop have branches In various parts 
of the country but If you can't find a 
branch nearby give the Birmingham shop a 
ring on 021-632 4804 for more 
Information, 



FOUR IN A ROW . . . Cont. 

4388 60=5 ft 0L 

4488 C0LN0=INT(RND( 1>*7> + ] 
4418 IF LINE(C0LNQ>=8 THEN GOTO 4488 
4588 GOTO 1888 
5880 END 

18888 REM SET UP DISPLAY LIST 
18884 REM STD, LIST IS 88 LINES OR. MOD 
E 7 * 4 LINES OR. MODE 8 
18886 REM CHANGE TO i LINE Oft. MODE 1 + 
72 LINES 0k. MODE 7 ♦ 4 LINES OR, MODE 
8 

18818 DUST-PEEK<540>+PEEK<Sai)*254+4 
18828 POKE DL I ST- 1,76: POKE DLIST+2,4 
]8838 1=3 

18848 DLHI=PEEK(DLISTM+6.s 
18845 RETURN 

18858 POKE DLIST+I , PEEK' DL 1ST M+6> 
18868 IF DLHI=PEEK<561> THEN RETURN 
18878 1=1+1 

10888 IF 1>108 THEN STOP 
18898 GOTO 10848 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



18 



TINY TEXT 

Stan Ockers and Jim Carr 

Fancy using your 400 or 800 as a mini 
word-processor? Even if you don't have 
a printer? TINY-TEXT will allow you to 
do just that. It is a very clever 
cassette (or disk) based text editor 
which will allow you to compose letters 
or articles and send the cassette 
through the post to be read or printed 
straight out by the receiver. It was 
developed by Stan Ockers for the Eugene 
ACE Newsletter to enable readers to 
send in ' ready 1 copy and I hope readers 
will start using it to send In articles 
to PAGE 6 as well as writing to each 
o t he r . 



USING THE PROGRAM 

The OPTION key Is used to select one 
of five options: LOAD, EDIT, PRINT, 
SAVE and DISPLAY. The following 

paragraphs describe the use of each of 
these functions. 

LOAD OPTION 

The LOAD option is used to re-load 
text which has been saved on cassette or 
disk. When the LOAD option is selected 
you will be asked to give a file name of 
the text you wish to load. - If the text 
is on cassette simply type C (no 
quotation marks). The computer will 
'beep' once In the normal way to remind 
you to set up the recorder. Then press 
RETURN and the text will load. If you 
are using disk, type the complete file 
name of the text file. For example 
D: TEXT1.TXT. 

EDIT OPTION 

The EDIT option lets you enter text or 
make changes to text already entered. 
ENTERING TEXT: When the Edit mode is 
requested, a blank area {text window) 
appears In the centre of the screen- Up 
to three lines of text can be typed in 
this window. Pressing RETURN causes the 
text in the window to be added to the 
text already entered. You can use all 
the standard screen editing functions to 
edit any text in this window. NOTE 
however that all trailing blanks in the 
window will be deleted so 



each line should 
complete word and a 
the next line. 



be ended 
blank used 



with a 
to start 



Functions such as tabbing and 
indentation are controlled by special 
formatting symbols. These symbols 

always cause the current line to be 
ended before the requested formatting 
function is executed. The following 
formatting symbols may be used: 
CTRL-E End current line and start a new 
line with no indentation. 
CTRL-I Indent the next line. 
CTRL-S Space before starting the next 
line. 

CTRL-T Tab over a set number of spaces 
before starting the next line. 
CTRL-C Centre the next line. 
CTRL-P Advance the printer forms to the 
top of the next page before printing the 
next line. 

EDITING TEXT: When you are in the 
Edit mode, pressing the SELECT key will 
cause the line of text below the window 
to be moved up Into the window. The 
normal screen edltting functions can 
then be used to change the text in the 
window. Use the joystick to scroll the 
desired line to the position below the 
text window and from side to side If 
needed. Pressing SELECT twice without 
making any changes, simply moves the 
text line Into the window and back 
again. To delete a line of text move it 
to below the text window and press 
RETURN. Pressing the joystick trigger 
will cause you to jump to the end of the 
present text. 

PRINT OPTION 

This option prints the formatted text 
on your printer. Before the printing 
begins you have a chance to alter the 
default setting for line length, tab 
stop &tc. Use the screen edit functions 
to make the desired changes, then press 
RETURN. The items which may be changed 
are : 

LINE - Line length (max. characters per 
line) 

INDENT - The no, of spaces to be 
indented (left margin) 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



19 



TAB STOP - The number of spaces for the 

tab 

PAPER SIZE - The total number of lines 

which can be printed on a fully covered 

page . 

FORMS FEED - The no. of lines to skip to 

seperate the bottom of one page from the 

top of the next. For example, if you 

require 3 blank lines top and bottom, 

then set forms feed to 6, 

SAVE OPTION 

This option lets you save your text on 
either cassette or disk. When the Save 
option is chosen you will be asked to 
enter a file name. If you are using 
cassette simply type C and then set up 
the recorder when you hear two 'beeps' . 
Press RETURN. If you are using disk 
enter a complete legal filename, 

DISPLAY OPTION 

This option displays text in formatted 
form on the screen. It uses the same 
format change function as the Print 
option excepting Paper Size and Forms 
Feed. 

Get used to the above control 
functions and you will have a very easy 
to use and versatile text editor. If 
you wish to make any changes to the 
program you should first change line 14 
which automatically expands the main 
data storage array T$ to the memory size 
of your computer. Try changing 

"SIZ=FRE(0)-50" to ■ f SIZ=FRE(0)-500". 
When you have finished making any 
changes restore line 14 to Its original 
form . 

Any system errors are trapped and 
printed out by the program. You are 
then prompted to press RETURN. If you 
make any mistakes such as selecting LOAD 
or SAVE when you did not want to, enter 
an illegal file name and you can easily 
recover by pressing return. 

There you have it! A brilliant little 
program that I have been using to get 
all the copy ready for this magazine. 
If you can make any improvements let me 



know and I will let ACE know. Above all 
start using this to write a few magazine 
articles - even with 16K and no printer, 
you now have the opportunity to widely 
expand the use of your Atari. 



REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



kxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



* 

* 
K 



TIMYTEXT by STAN OCKERS 

and JIM CARR - FIRST 

PUBLISHED IN ACE 

NEWSLETTER 

3662, VINE htoPLE DRIVE 

EUGENE, OREGON 97465, U.S. A 



X 

* 



axxxxxxxxxxxxaxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



i 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

8 

12 DIM SP*<48):F0R 1=1 TO 48sSP*a i I) = 

" ":NEXT I 

14 DIM S*<45> , l*U20) , A*< 123) sSIZ=FR£( 

6)-50:DIM TfCSIZ) :F0R 1«1 TO 45:READ A 

:S*<n~CHR*<A> :NEXT I 

26 DATA 104, 184, 133,284, 184, 133,203,11 

4,133,266, 164.133,265, 164, 164, 169 , 162, 

8, 161,283, 145,263. 198.203. 165 

36 DATA 203,281,255,203,2,198,204,165, 

263.197,205,208,236,165,264,197,206,20 

8, 2^ ,96 

40 FOR 1=1536 TO 1643;READ A:POKE I, A: 

NEXT I 

56 DATA 104, 104, 133,294, 104, 133.263. 16 

4. 133,206,104*, 133.205, 162.6, 169.240,32 

,53, 6 i 169, 46,32, 9 1,6 

60 DATA 165. 20:', 203, 3, 169, 140,32,91,6, 

24,144,10,169,46,32,53,6.169,126,32,91 

,6, 169,240,32,53,6,96 

70 DATA 133, 268,161. 263. 261,96.176,11, 

261,32,176,5,24,185,64.203,2,233,32,12 

9,265, 239, 263 ,208, 2 

36 DATA 230,204,230,285,203,2.238,206, 

193, 263. 203, 22 1,96, 133,283,169.0,129,2 

05,230,205,203.2 

90 DATA 230,206,193,208,208,244,96 

110 P=241:P0KE 267,6 :P0KE 82,0:OPEN *t2 

,4.8,"E:":T*<1> = ,, ."!T*<488>- 1, . ,, !T*<2>- 

T* 

120 SCR=PEEKv83)+256XPEEKC89>+12e:LL=7 

; LM=5 : I ND=5 : TAB=49 : PS=66 : FF=6 : GOTO 58 



298 ? "INSERT TEXT OR . . . PRESS SELEC 

T TO EDIT" 

295 POKE 702,0: REM Ensure lower case i 

nput 

300 POSITION 8,8;? SIZ-LENCT*) ; " FREE 
■;S=STICK(0) :IF S=15 THEN 330 
IF S=14 AND P<LEN(T*>-320 THEN 



305 
+ 48 
318 
315 
+ 1 



IF S=13 AND P>286 THEN P=P-40 
IF S=ll AND P<LEN<T4)-288 THEN 



P=P 



P=P 
over 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



20 



329 IF S=7 AND P}241 THEN P=P- 1 

338 A=USR< 1536,ADRCT$) +P-241 ,SCR> 

335 K=8 

340 POKE 53279, 8:PK=PEEK<5327?) : IF PK= 

5 THEN GOSUB 988 

350 IF PK=3 THEN 500 

369 IF PEEK (764K255 THEN 406 

365 K=K+1:IF K< 19 THEN 349 

378 IF STRlG(0^-8 THEN P=LEN(T*) -248 iP 

OKE 207,0 

398 GOTO 380 

408 POSITION 0,18: INPUT *2; I*sPK=PEEK< 

207) : IF PK=8 THEN A*=" " 

465 LI=LENCI*> :LT=LEN(T*) :IF LI"9 THEN 

460 
407 IF Lt+LT>SI2 THEN POSITION 8,1:? " 
OUT OF SPACE ":GQTG 308 
418 IF PK=J THEN A*=T^F,P+3?> : I F T*CP 
+ 39,P+39) = '' " THEN I»CLI+1)*" " :LI=Ll+ 
1 

428 LA=LEN(A*> :AD=ADR<T*) :IF LI>LA THE 
H A-USRtADR(S*> ,AD+LT- 1 .AD+P-2 ,LI-LA) 
438 T*<P.P+L1-1)«I* 
440 IF LA>LI THEN T*<P+i.I)=T*<P+LA) 
450 P=P+LI:T*iLT+LI-Lh+1>= , ":P0KE 207, 
8: GOTO 380 

4^0 IF P£EK<207>-1 THEN 478 
465 IF P<LEN<T*)-27? THEN T*<P>=T*<P+4 

0)" 

470 POKE 764, 255 f GOTO 388 

508 TRAP 95§:ST«PEEK<56fi)+PEEK<54l>*25 

6+4 {POKE ST- 1,70 1 POKE ST + 2, 7 : POKE ST + 3 

, U2iP0KE ST+4,6:P0KE ST+5 T o 

585 POKE 3T+24,65 

510 POKE ST+23, PEEK < 56«) I POKE ST+26,PE 

EKC541) 

515 OPaOP+t:IF 0P~* THEN 0P~ ] 

528 ? CHR*< 125> :PQSITIGN 28, 8: IF 0P»1 

THEN ? "LOAD ■ 

522 IF 0P=2 THEN 7 "EDIT" 

534 IF 0P=3 THEN ? "PRINT 1 

536 IF 0P=4 THEN ? "SAVE" 

538 IF 0P=5 THEN ? "DISPLAY 11 

540 POSITION B,lx? "PRESS START TO BEG 

IN" 

550 FOR D-l TO Mi NEXT D 

555 POKE 53279 ,3: IF PEEK<53279)=3 THEN 

515 
557 IF PEEK(53279X>6 THEN 555 
568 POKE 764,255:P0SIT10N 26,1:? CHR*< 
125/ {POSITION 0,1 :0N OP GOTO 2008,290, 
598.1508,590 

589 REM XX «=ESC TAB, ARROWS IN LINES 5 
90 AND 595 - LINES 594 AND 595 IN INUE 
RSE 

590 FOR 1=1 TO 6:? "■'jiNEXT I:? :FOR 
1-1 TO 6:? " ";;NEXT I:? " " 
594 POSITION 0,1:? "SET FORMAT CONTROL 
S" POSITION 8,6:? "LINE LEFT I!M- 

TAB PAGE FORM'; 



595 ? "SIZE MARG DENT STOP S 
1ZE FEED';:?" " ;LL; \ *" ;LM;" , ■■ ? IND 
;' ,« ,, ;TAB; I \*" ;PS;" , *" jFF : POSIT I ON 8,8 

608 INPUT LL.LM,IND,TAB,PS,FF:P=240 
718 LINE*8 {GRAPHICS 0: POSIT I ON 8,3:FL= 



7 1 5 RL=LL :T P=P : B=ttSC i. T* k TP ,TP> ) 
728 RL=LL-IND*(B=?)-TAB*CB=28) 

725 IF B=l9 AND 0P=3 AND LINE<=< PS-FF) 
THEN LPRINT ■ ":LINE«LINE*1 

726 IF B-19 AND 0P=5 THEN ? 

727 IF B=16 AND 0P=3 THEN FOR 1=1 TO P 
3-LINE:LPRINT " " :NEXT I :LINE=8 

728 IF B=l6 AND 0P«5 THEN ? I? :? :LIN 
E=8 

735 O8;K«0 

740 K=K+i;TP=TP+ S;IF K=RL+1 THEN ^65 

745 IF TP>LEN<T*J -241 THEN FL=1?G0T0 3 

10 

758 H=ASC(T*<TP,TPU )IF A<32 THEN C=0 : 
GOTO 788 

755 IF A-32 THEN C-C+ 1 
760 GOTO 748 

765 IF C«9 THEN A*»T*(P+1 ,TP-1mTP»TP- 
lsGOTO 810 

767 IF T*<TP,TP) = " " THEN AS=T*<P+l f TP 
-1) sGOTO 810 

76S IF T*\TP-1,TP-1'» = " " THEN C*C-1 
770 K=l 
775 TP=TP-1:1F T*<TP.TP>C" H THEN K»K 

+ 1 j GOTO 775 

78B IF TP=P+1 THEN P=TP:GQTO 715 

785 A*="":l=P+t 

790 A*>; LEW<A*) + 1) »T« 1 1 , 1) t IF T*( I , I> O 

" " THEN 30 5 

795 IF C)l THEN A-INT<K/C+RND<8)> sIF A 

}0 THEN FOR J*l TO A :h*< LEN<A$) + 1) =" " 

:NEXT J;K=K-A 

306 C=C--1 

302 IF C-I AND K>0 THEN FOR J=l TO K:A 

*<LEN(A*)+1>=" 'iNEXT J 

805 1=1+1: IF KTP THEN 790 

318 IF FL THEN A*=T*CP+ 1 ,TP- 1> 

815 IF 0P=3 THEN LINE=LINE+ J ; IF L1NEX 

PS-FF) THEN LlNE«liFQR 1=1 TO FFsLPRIN 

T " " :NEXT I 

820 SP=LM+<B=9)SIND+(B=28)XTAB+<B=3>K( 

LL-LEN(A*))/2:IF SP>48 THEN SP=40 

830 IF 0P=3 THEN LPRINT SP*U,SP>;At 

840 IF 0P=5 THEN ? SF*U,SP);A$ 

845 POKE 53279,3 

350 IF FL THEN ? :? S? " END OF PRESEN 

T TEXT. PRESS START" 

855 IF FL THEN IF PEEK ( 53279) <>6 THEN 
855 

856 IF FL THEN 500 
868 F^TPtGOTO 715 

908 PK=PEEK(287) :IF PK= 1 THEN POKE 287 

,8: GOTO 930 

918 IF PK=8 AND P<LEN(Tt)-279 THEN POK 

E 287,1 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



21 



TINY TEXT 



Cont. 



?39 ^USR(1536,ADR(T*)+P-241,SCR) :F0R 
D=i TO 50: NEXT D: RETURN 
?5B ? "ERROR " * PEEK ( 195) ;" AT " ;256*PE 
EK< 187>+PEEK( 1845 i? "PRESS RETURN TO C 
ONTINUE"* INPUT l*:GOTO 59 G 
1560 ? " ENTER FILE NAME H :INPUT I*:OPE 
N *3 T 8,0>I* :N=INT<LEN(T*)/123) :PRINT # 
3,N:IF N=*0 THEN ST=0:GOTO 1520 
1510 FOR 1=1 TO N:ST= 128* I sPRINT tt3;T* 
(ST-127,ST) :NEXT 1 

1520 PRINT M3;Tf C5T+ 1 ,LEN<T$> > : CLOSE *) 
3: GOTO 580 

2@ea ? ■ ENTER FILE NAME" i INPUT I*:GPE 
N #3. 4, 0,1$: INPUT #3,N:IF N=0 THEN BEG 
=-127: GOTO 2020 

20 10 GRAPHICS 0:FOR 1-1 TO N:BEG=12S*I 
-127: INPUT *3,ft*:? A*; :T*(B£G) =A*iNEXT 

I 
2620 INPUT #3 J A$iT*CBE6+128)-A*tCL0SE 
«3:POKE I53i,104:GOTO 500 



FULL FUNCTION 
TYPEWRITER TYPE 
KEYBOARD FOR 
ATARI 400* 



tiiiiiiiiiunnniiintuuu 




AT £58.00 



32 K RAM PACK 
48K RAM PACK 



Retail Price 

£65 PLUS YOUR OLD 
£95 16K RAMPACK 

Ask for details of our 
Atari Games Hire Library 

FROM: BLABY VIDEO & COMPUTER GAMES, 
Crossways House, Lutterworth Road, 
Blaby. Leicester. Tel: (0533) 773641 



'Atari and Atari 400 are registered trademarks of Atari Inc. 



User Groups 

PAGE 6 will try and promote User 
Groups in che U.K. if Ciub Secretaries 
will send In details. If -you are new to 
Atari computing then the best way to 
learn Is to meet other folks who have 
the same interests. Whether you are an 
expert or complete novice, any of the 
Groups below will welcome you at their 
next meeting. 



MERSEYSIDE ATARI COMPUTER CLUB. 

Meetings every other Tuesday (next one 
8th March) at: 

THE BRADFORD HOTEL, 

TITHEBARN STREET, 

LIVERPOOL. 

The Club have been going for some 
while now and have a software library, 
run tutorials, arrange discounts etc. 
Meetings start at 7.00 p.m. and you can 
go along to the first one free. For 
more details contact Roy Gibson on 051 
606 9553 



PRESTON ATARI COMPUTER ENTHUSIASTS, 

Meetings on the 3rd Thursday of evt±ry 
month at 7.30 p.m. Meet at: 

KNIGHTS OF ST. COLUMBIA, 
OFF BLACKPOOL ROAD, 

BEECH GROVE, 
ASHTON, NR. PRESTON. 

Despite their name, all makes of 

computer are represented. Contact 

Rowland Taylor on 0253 738192 for 
details . 

EDINBURGH AND LQTHIANS ATARI USER GROUP 

Meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd 
Thursday each month, commencing 7.30 

p.m. at: 

ASTON HOTEL, 

ASTON CRESCENT, 

EDINBURGH 

Contact Silicon Centre 031 557 4546 
for more details. 



hsue2 



PAGE 6 



22 



Software 



STRATOS 



ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 



1/2 PLAYERS 



16KCASS. 



32K DISK 



Stratos makes no pretensions* it Is 
definitely an arcade game - It even 
starts with a request for you to 'Insert 
Coin or Press Start' I Perhaps you put 
the coins in that mysterious right hand 
slot on the 8001 

Stratos is played on a single screen 
where you have a city which is defended 
by a force field beamed overhead from 
towers at each side of the screen. At 
the base of each tower are land based 
guns which can be aimed at attacking 
e^emy craft with a 'floating' sight. 
M'Korg Star jammers in groups of three 
are out to destroy firstly the force 
field and then the city. The tiro guns 
fire together and the resulting 'energy 1 
collides at the point of your aim and 
spills out to destroy your enemy. This 
effect diminishes however as the enemy 
begin to destroy the power towers inside 
the City, The game plays well and is 
not too difficult - at least at the 
Noviee level-and has a few nice touches 
such as the ability to change the 
background and City colours to any 
colours of you choice, from restful to 
glaring! There is a continuous sound of 
the force field being generated but If 
this begins to fray your nerves you can 
change the pitch to a more restful level. 

There are one or two player options 
and a high score feature as well as two 
skill levels. There Is also a repair 
saucer with the ability to patch up the 
force field during 'pauses In play' 
although when these occur I am not 
sure I When the enemy stops attacking, 
you are faced with a meteor showerl 

For an arcade game which runs on 16K 
cassette Stratos is pretty good although 
the more advanced gamer may find it a 
bit too easy - unless there is something 



more lurking at the higher score 
levels. There are no levels as such - 
the scoring Is along the lines of the 
popular arcade games in that you score 
bonus points at the end of each 'wave' 
and get a bonus saucer at 20,000 
points. Another good quality arcade 
game but with a slight difference and 
well worth a try. 



PREPPIE 



ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 



l/2 PLAYERS 



16K CASS. 



32K DISK 



PREPPIE is probably quite well known 
by now but deserves a mention as It has 
some of the best graphics and sound of 
all the Atari games developed so far. 
Make that all the COMPUTER gam^s 
developed so far, because no other home 
computer can come near achieving the 
capabilities of the Atari and this game 
proves it. 

PREPPIE is like Frogger in that you 
have to get your ' Preppie' (American for 
schoolboy) across the golf course with 
assorted mowers, tractors and golf 
buggies and then aero s 3 a river with 
boats, logs and alligators. In this 
game however you must retrieve golf 
balls and make it back again. The game 
is not too difficult to play (I scored 
over 12000 the first try!) and is 
probably ideally suited to children even 
if they just watch you play- The 
graphics and the music will keep them 
enthralled and there will be howls of 
laughter when the Preppie falls in the 
river or gets squashed by a golf cart I 

The game obviously gets more difficult 
as you go through the levels but is 
probably one which you could actually 
master. Even level 10 is not that 
difficult, but then I have discovered a 
way of jumping straight to level 10 and 
starting with five men instead of 
threel (Any offers?) 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



23 



If you have a young family, this game 
Is ideal. The Instructions include a 
five page story Introduction and even If 
the young ones can't get very far in 
playing, they will love watching. 



surface regularly. 



SEA DRAGON 



ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 



1/2 PLAYERS 



16KCASS 



32K DISK 



What about an arcade style game that 
is nice and relaxing, instead of having 
you Jumping out of your seat? At first 
sight SEA DRAGON appears to be just the 
thing. 

Your submarine glides slowly along and 
you can <tlve or surface at realistically 
slow speeds all the while accompanied by 
the soporific deep 'bleep' of the 
radar. All you need to do in the game 
is to shoot mines which are either 
tethered or on the seabed and then 
negotiate some underground passages. 
Great, I thought, no more ending up a 
nervous wreck after fighting off the 
first hoard of aliens. " Wrong! There 
are no aliens, but SEA DRAGON turns out 
to be just as nerve wracking to play as 
all the best arcade games. The problem 
is, believe it or not, the very slowness 
of the game. The mines on the seabed 
break loose at random and float 
upwards. Unless you have anticipated 
them and have time to fall back, you are 
stuck trying to slowly back away whilst 
knowing you are not going to make it' 
Negotiating the underground passages is 
difficult as there is very little room 
and rising vertically takes some control 
as the screen is scrolling at a constant 
rate. You have to both go up and 
backwards at the same time to avoid 
deadly contact with the walls. Farther 
on Into the game the passages get 
narrower, the mines more frequent and 
ships above drop depth charges. Oh, and 
by the way, there are ' Super shooters' 
protecting some of the passages and 
force fie Ids protecting the Master Mine. 
And you can run out of air If you don't 



1 started off thinking this 
easy game, got fed up with it 



a very 
when I 

found out how hard it is but now that I 
have managed to negotiate some of the 
passages, have become quite addicted* 
One minor criticism is that the High 
Score feature is set at 5000 before you 
start the game and it takes a long while 
to have your scores registered! 



SHAMUS 



5YNAPSE 



1 PLAYER 



16KCASS. 



32 K DISK 



I sat back., covered in perspiration, 
nails bitten to the quick and a feeling 
In the pit of my stomach that is 
indescribable. My name is SHAMUS and I 
have Just returned from the latest 
attempt to trap that evil creature, the 
Shadow, in his lair. He lives four 
levels down inside an underground 
hideaway. Each level can only be 
reached by obtaining coloured keys to 
fit the matching locks. As 1 ventured 
along passageways and through rooms, the 
guardians of the shadow attempt to kill 
me. They come in many guises and are 
deadly, The first level contains 37 
rooms and passages, each one different 
from the next* The walls are 

electrified and contact means certain 
death. Right, I feel better now, one 
more try. 

SHAMUS is one of the best programs to 
come from Synapse, using all the best In 
sound and graphics your Atari can offer, 

Mike Reynolds- Jones. 



SUBSCRIBE 



to PAGE 6 

see page three for details 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



24 



GETTING STARTED 

LesEllingham 



It is quite often the small things 
that cart make an ordinary program a 
little bit more special. If you take 
care In the presentation of your program 
Including such things as titles and 
Instructions, you will end up with a 
program which will Impress people from 
the start . 



18 GRAPHICS 8:PQKE 752,1 

58 ? CHR*< 125? POSITION 18,21s? "PRESS 

START TO BEGIN" :REM START IN 1NUERSE 
68 FOR 1=1 TO 2 STEP 8,81 
70 POKE 755,1 

38 IF PEEK(5327?)=6 THEN 188 
98 NEXT I: GOTO 68 
108 ? CHR*(125):? 'PROGRAM HAS STARTED 



Here are a couple of simple routines 
to add life to the beginning of your 
programs. Listing 1 for Graphics 
simply POKEs the Character Base Register 



at location 755 with a 

Inverse characters 

changing the loop in 

combination between 

different 

the step 

flashing. 



1 which makes all 

disappear. Try 

line 60 to any 

and 4 for 

results. Alter the value of 

to change the speed of the 



]f=J I =l I =it=lfSi r=ir=i 



BELL & JONES 

39, QUEENS SQUARE, 

WEST BROMWICH, 

Tel. 021-553 0820 

MOST ATARI PRODUCTS 
IN STOCK AT KEEN PRICES 

GOOD RANGE OF 

INDEPENDENT SOFTWARE IN 

STOCK 




CALL AND SEE US SOON 

EASY PARKING IN MULTl 
STOREY CAR PARK ONLY 
A FEW YARDS FROM THE SHOP 



SPECTRUM COMPUTER 
CENTRE 



*d/su/ma 



Listing 2 works in Graphics 1 or 2 and 
simply cycles the inverse characters 
through the colors available. Location 
710 controls the color value of inverse 
upper case letters in these modes. 



18 GRAPHICS 1+16 

28 ? #6;"PRESS START TO BEGIN" i REM STA 
RT IN IWERSE 
38 FOR 1=8 TO -255 
40 POKE 710,1 

58 IF PEEK (5327?) =6 THEN 108 
68 NEXT I sGOTO 38 
188 ? #6 ;' PROGRAM HAS STARTED" 
118 GOTO 118 



Listing 3 runs through a string and 
makes each character 'Inverse' which ip 
Graphics 1 & 2 simply changes the color 
of the characters. Try adding somts 
sound to this routine. 



5 DIM A*(28> 

6 A*="PRESS start TO BEGIN" 
18 GRAPHICS 1+16 

28 POSITION 8,1:? *6;A* 
38 FOR 1=1 TO LEN(A*) 
10 A*(I ,I)=CHR*<ASCCA*(l,I>>+I23) 
58 POSITION 8,1:? #6;A* 
55 IF PEEK < 5327?) =6 THEN 180 
68 NEXT I 
70 GOTO 30 

108 ? #65" PROGRAM HAS STARTED* 
118 GOTO 110 






Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



25 



First Steps 



First steps this month will 

concentrate on a problem which I know is 
common to many of our readers. How to 
get VULTURES III running I 

Whilst much of what we will say will 
be specific to Vultures many of the 
principles will apply to all listings 
which are typed in from magazines. The 
first hard lesson to learn - like it or 
not - is that 9S% {or so) of the time 
Che reason that a program won't run is 
because YOU have made typing mistakes I 
Don't get upset, I make typing errors so 
does everyone 1 have come across - we 
all have to learn the hard way, 
Although the listing of Vultures was not 
very clear (blame the Atari 822 printer 
which has now died completely) the 
program does run as listed. 

Lesson number one is, when any program 
has machine language in it, SAVE IT 
BEFORE YOU RUN IT. Any mistakes in 
entering data can lock up your machine 
making the only means of recovery to 
switch off and start again. Machine 
language is usually included in a Basic 
program as a series of DATA statements 
so when you see blocks of DATA - beware! 
It is probably a good idea to get into 
the habit of saving ALL Programs before 
you run them and you don't have to wait 
until you have completed a listing, you 
can save It at any time making it 
possible to put in a long listing over 
several evenings. The biggest headache 
is to try and find out where you are 
likely to have made your mistake - not 
easy! Common errors in typing DATA 
statements include typing an (letter) 
instead of a Q(figure), using a full 
stop instead of a comma or missing out 
commas thus ending up with numbers 
greater than 255. Most of the problems 
in Vultures stemmed from these type of 
errors In the big block of DATA between 
lines 2000 and 2080. If you have still 
not got it running try making the 
following changes which will check the 
DATA, 

LINE 2000 delete :NEXT I 

Add line 2085 TOT-T0T+A : N . I :IF 

TOT <> 3 92 59 THEN ? "ERROR IN 



DATA":T0T=G:STGF 

If you get the error message, there Is 
no getting away from it - you must check 
every one of those DATA statements! 

If you get ERROR 8 messages when 
reading in DATA then you have characters 
or punctuation in the statements- If 
you are using a FOR,,., NEXT loop to read 
in the data then you can pinpoint the 
area of the error by asking the computer 
to print the value of the FOR.., NEXT 
variable and the value of the last 
statement read. For example if you get 
an ERROR 8 message in line 2000 of 
Vultures, the loop variable is I and the 
variable for the DATA is A. Ask the 
computer to PRINT I, A- The two figures 
you get are first the number of times 
the loop has executed before coming to 
the error and secondly the value of the 
last CORRECT data statement read. You 
should be able to count through the DATA 
statements to the I'th number which 
should be wrong. The number before 
should be your last correctly read item 
of data , 

This Idea of checking variables is 
very useful for tracing bugs. You can 
always stop a program at any time by 
using the BREAK Key and then ask the 
computer to PRINT the value of a 
variable or the content of strings. If 
you can figure out whether a variable is 
behaving correctly you should be able to 
narrow down the likely area of error. 

If you still can't get Vultures going 
and you feel it Is because you may have 
read the bad (awful?) printing wrongly, 
send me a stamped addressed envelope and 
I will send you off a full original 
listing . 



Would anyone like to write this colum 
for a future Issue? It would be 

interesting to get alternative views - 
perhaps a humorous story t incorporating 
a few hints and tips of how you survived 
that nerve -wracking first few months 
with your new Atari computer? Let me 
know. 



■ # - ■ ■ 



Issue 2 



PAGE 6 



26 



B.U.G. Club call 



Well BUG at last appears to be 
settling down and making some real 
progress. Many of the members who came 
to the Constitution meeting at the end 
of November seem to have stayed away 
from subsequent meetings but they have 
missed some good meetings since. Agreed 
the constitution evening was a bore, but 
it was vitally necessary for the 
survival and well being of the Club. 

Our 'Christmas Special 1 meeting on the 
9th December , although perhaps a bit 
early to be really festive, went very 
well with plenty going on. The local 
retailers generously supported the 
evening with the donation of prizes for 
the various competitions and in fact 
there were so many prises available that 
we found it hard to give them all away! 
The main event of our meeting of 27th 
January was a talk by Lawrence Miller of 
Games Workshop on strategy and adventure 
type games, an area which is not too 
well represented in the present 'arcade' 
era. If you missed either of these 
meetings you missed something good. 

Mike Aston has begun a series of 
beginners classes for basic which 
represents a good opportunity to discuss 
any problems you may have if you are 
just starting, whilst Colin Boswell is 
trying to get together a discussion 
group on Assembler. Other courses and 
classes are possible but the success of 
those already arranged and future events 
depends on you. You must let the 
committee know what you want and more 
importantly be prepared to join in and 
support any activity, 

There have been some changes recently 
on the Committee and the Officers of the 
Club are now: 

Chairman - Mike Reynolds-Jones 
Vice-Chaiman - Keith Mason 
Secretary - Mike Aston 
Treasurer - Steve Gould 

Get to know these people and the rest of 
the committee and let them know what you 
want the club to arrange and how you are 
willing to help. 



Steve Gould now has a software library 
running where you tan off-load your 
unwanted software and borrow other 
games, books and magazines. The scheme 
is growing fast so make sure you don't 
miss out, ask Steve for details at the 
next meeting. 

Lots of other ideas are in the melting 
pot and we are making contact with other 
User Groups. Come along to future 



meetings to find out 
just sit there, bring 
or your programs. Even 
one of the committee 
'Would it be possible 
will have done your bit 



more, but don't 
along some ideas 

if you just grab 

members and say 

to 

to help BUG 



into the best User 
Watch out America! 



Group In the 



you 
grow 
U.K. 



One area we should be looking into is 
building a library of software written 
by members of the Group. If you bring 
along programs you have written you can 
discuss these with other members and 
when they are ready they can build into 
a 'user written' library. Once built 
up, the possibilities for exchange with 
other groups arise, particularly with 
User Groups in America where exchange of 
libraries is one of the best means of 
contact and learning. Some of the 

bigger Groups in America have libraries 
of over 3000 programs. 



W ; .Nl?eftj4PfWT flTAHv. COMPUTE £ CUJ& 






-■me ^DU^c^'Pfl^ie^-i^i users' e^oF— 

pJjj-5 , . , P&^M LOTISS*' EjcftfiT &TPJICS - OSHftTiTiCMS' 

M>£T/i**=$ =*cy v* km 4 B Tmtfsoftir 
CF Ztai MertW At imf v*USl G£Tu- -TV.tM*T*C«, 
*• T4i Sou- fr*G , 3i0ji*4&Hft*\. 
ae oo^< 4t«*s MOW— iw'»4&5 Sw*T 7*904*1. 







SHERWOODS {PHOTO* LTD 

11/13 Great Western Arcade 

Birmingham 2 



we guarantee the 

BEST PRICES 

in town on all ATARI product 

PHONE FOR THE KEENEST 
PRICE OR CALL IN 



32K & 48K RAMS PLUS 
REPLACEMENT KEYBOARD FOR 400 

FULL RANGE OF INDEPENDENT 
SOFTWARE 

Telephone 021-236 7211 



cmnnEL 




SOFTWARE 



THE CONSTRUCTOR 



THE CONSTRUCTOR is probably the most 
versatile and useful utility yet devised for Atari. 
It will enable the user to design up to 4 players 
and then save the relevant bit-map data in a 
form that can be merged with the users own 
program. Some of the main features are: — 
CONSTRUCT PLAYER; Using a joystick, players 
of up to 22 lines high can be designed and 
edited. 

REPLICATE PLAYER: Build a player, then copy 
that shape for players 2, 3 and 4. This allows 
sequence images to be very easily designed, 
EXAMINE PLAYERS: It is possible to overfay 
and animate players while they are at the 
design stage. 

THE CONSTRUCTOR is available only on disk 
and requires 48K of memory. The price is 
£24.95 inc. p. & p. Send for details. 

Atari 400 Computer (16K) .... £199.00 
Atari 400 Computer (48K) .... £289.00 
Atari 800 Computer (16K) ... £339,00 

Atari 410 Recorder £ 49.99 

Atari 810 Disk Drive £299 00 

UDIO LTD ■shbss 

• PW IIV Tel: (0772)53057 



noRmfln 




VICTAGRAPH - PLOT WINDOW 

The above photographs show VICTAGRAPH PLOT 
WINDOW and demonstrations RUN on ATARI 400. GR 8. 
Have you got PLOT, DRAWTO or similar to an absolute 
coordinate?. 

Could you draw the above screen display?. 

Without u sing g rap h-paper? 

Place your drawing in the VICTAGRAPH and your are ready 

(o plot ail the points, using the movable window mask and 

easy to read scale. Plot 0,0 in each comer and a fully 

adjustable window to 320 ,200... working area 1 3" x 8" total 

size 17'x 12" appro*, 

Total Price £7.00. Cheque. PO to: VICTA CERAMICS 




VICTA CERAMICS ( wmi 

6A BOW STREET, RUGELEY, STAFFS, WS15 2BT^<>) 



CREATIVESOFTWARECREATIVESOFTWAHECREATIV 



EC 



software 



ATARI 400/800 E 
SOFTWARE 



48 Hartlip Hill, Newlngton, Sittirigboume, Keni ME9 7NZ. 




BAJA BUGGIES MGk.Cl £ZZ 95 - T«| yo Lr dWStl drying skill; 
ASTRO CHASE (33* C D) C20.S0 — Afcade Action at ils C*s1 
GORF i32k.D| EZS.'SS — No need to play it in tha Arcaoes 
CHOPLIFTEP <48k DJ £21 95 - A 3-D hskcoetor rescua arcade game 
BANDITS ;4B* D) £22.95 — The uhimate experience lor Arcade Action 
NIC PARANOIA <32k C) £23 95 An Artadft game win a ciiHenencB 
PROTECTOR II (32k.C Hi £23 96 - Suparinr version rj1 oriq-nal Proleclnr 
■ OTHER TITLES 



EC 



SoNvsrn enacted 14 it available by Iha time nl ptibl i : a 1 t. in 

pfltfriE [16* i.; i 

GHOST HUNTER (1Gk.C) 
ClWPTOFTHiUllCUAp.'JOli U 
STELLAR SHUTTLE |16h.C I 
CANTON CLIMBER i' 16k CM 16k 0) 



C, 1 
■Tf ■ ■ 



116 95 
£18.« 

119 95 
£19.50 

u. PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY i l&fc C Ul £1B.95 

TUMBLEBUG5 l24fc.D) E1B.85 

PATHFINDER >:3?h U I £22 50 

WNU& VOYAGER 1 16k C 32k d| £16 95 

GHOST ENCOUNTERS 1 1 6k CD"i LIB 95 

FHOGGERmGk C32k 3i EZ1 95 

JAWKHtAKfRilbli C Ul E1B 50 

DE LUKE INVADERS 'l,t n £21 95 

SH^«E EfTTE ---lifc Ji £1B95 

SPACE EGGS i-46k D I £18 95 

CHICKEN nek CHI £23 95 

CLAIM JUMPER Ifjk Cl £2195 



HEAROUARD Ink Cl 
ALIENCARDiNlBkfll 
TRACK ATTACK .:32k. D> 
BUG ATTACK |1 6k C.'3?k (]| 



LU 



shooting AHr.Anr ■ 

CLOWNS & BALLOONS 1 16k C'Di 
ANDROMEDA i?4k0) 
AlHSTHIKEM6kC3JkC-. 
TIME WARP | ■ &K C 32k Dl 
WIZARD OF WDRflGkOi 
THRESHOLD Wk.fjj 
MDU5KATTACK (32k v.: 
Ami SUB PATROL 1 1 6k. D'l 
CTCLC0 |4#k D) 
SNEAKERS l4Bk Ell 
SLIME !24k Ctrl ' 
ShWHUS(24k.C'D> 

SPECIAL OFFER: FREE BLANK DISKETTE WITH ANY 
DISK GAMES ORDERED (OFFER ENDS MAR 31 



£15 75 
£24 95 
C19&0 
CIS 5U 
E1B.B5 
Eli 9E 
£25 95 
"165* 
£18.95 
£24 K 
£25.35 

t\", a=> 

£15 95 

eis.se 

£23.95 
P3 95 

TWO 



m 






UTILITIES. ETC 

S.AM. SYNTHESISER 1 16k Di 
GRAPHIC MASTER K* v.. 
LE STICK 
Wl CO TRACKBALL 



£37 95 
£27 95 
£21 95 

£39 95 



HICHQ PAINTEH i4.lj.k Di £22 95 

K-CNDS i32h D| 1*7 50 

SANTA CRU* TUTORIALS 416k Cl £12 95 

VOICE BOX £99 15 



COL nun SOFTWARE CATALOGUE AVAILABLE — CI 00 (ONhielible lidin First order I 
FOR FULL LIST OF AVAILABLE* SOFTWARE. PLEASE SEND STAMP 



EC 



t- Please allow 2fi days for delivery. PoslaO* alcr <(Sp per ilem, Z 

OS3AllV3a33bVMldOS3AllV3HD3HVMlJOS3AllV3ao 



ATARI 



Cakista Computers Ltd 



119 JOHN BRIGHT STREET 

BIRMINGHAM 

021-632 6458 



ATARI 



ATARI 400 with Basic 
language 249.95 
without Basic lanquaqe 
£199.95 



ATARI 800 

with Basic language 16K 

£399.95 



ATARI 400 48K 
INC BASIC £299.99 
+ E10 p & p 



ATARI 800 

with Basic language 48K 

£479.95 




PREPPIE 

Tee olf on this crazy green Cross (he airigalor 
filled river (o recover wayward goii balls. In Ihis 

game danger lurks everywhere. Willi 28 Alari 
colours and super graphics, this game will de- 
light and thrill the gamester. 

Cassette £21 .99 Disc £21 .99 




TUTTI FRUTTI 

Savour a frutti feast With your famished frijil 

munching "hunger" bite a banana, gobble a 
grape or polish off a pear. But look out lor the 
nasty bugs lhal would spoil the fun. In this 
colourful jungle feast you may even gel a crack 
at the ever la sling Tutti Fruitless! 

Cassette E 17.99 Disc £17.99 






SEA DRAGON 

Prepare lo dive in your nuclear aimed sub. 
Guide your suh marine through a labyrinlh of 
passages and past underwater mountains. Try 
to avoid webs of explosive mines thai rise from 
the sea bottom. With mine dropping ships 
above, deadly lasers and stalaciites. try lo reach 
your goal — destruction of the nuclear reactor. 
Will you succeed in Ihis creative game'' 

Cassette £25.44 Disc £25.49 



ZAXXON 

This sensational arcade game of T9B2 is now available for use on 
your home computer system. Fly Ihrough a Ihree dimensioned 
like piayfiefd lo altack the fortress and us deadly armoured Robol. 
Survive this batlle and earn the ultimate challenge! 

Cassette £20.99 Disc £29.99 



ATARI 810 

Disc Drive with DOS II 
£299,95 



ATARI 410 

Cassette Recorder 
£49.99 



UPGRADES 

for ATARI 400 

32K £75.00 48K £99.95 






850 

Interface Module 

£135,00 



BUG OFF 

Here is the wackiest arcade style game yet. 
Your garden has la Hen inlo a Florida sink hole 
where weird forces have released a bevy of 
bizarre bugs. You must desiroy ihem with pincer 
sharp graphics and cotour and "your weapon 
DDT" — will you have time? 

Cassette £21 .99 Disc £21 -99 










ELIMINATOR 

Fans of this game — now it's available for the 
Alari 400 and 800. Pilot your Eliminator Craft 
Over alien lerrain and fight the hoards of 
marauding enemy ships. Superlative graphics 
and realistic sounds make ihis arcade style 
game exciting lo ihe end. 

Cassette £17.99 Disc £17 99 





STRATOS 

This is a kaleidoscope explosion of awesome 
graphics and other-worldfy sounds beyond all 
arcade style games. Above futuristic Megopolis 
sweep a wave of alien craft releasing awesome 
weaponry — the terrifying matter ravagers! With 
your joystick control of the Armageddon wave 
can you destroy them in lime? 

Cassette £25.49 Disc £25.49 




ASTRO CHASE 

Here is Ihe ultimate challenge. Defend the Earth from an awe- 
some attack by aliens. There is no escape from their force field 
sei around our galaxy? They launch their attach vessels and the 
chase begins — avoid deadly lasers, destroy space mines — 
save the Eanh from inevitable doom. 

Cassette £26,&Q Disc E26.50 






To: CALlStO COMPUTERS LTD. 1 T9 JOHN BRIGHT STREET, BIRMINGHAM 
PLEASE ACCEPT MY ORDER FOR THE FOLLOWING PROGHAMS:- 
1 

2 

3 ,.., 



Cakisto Computers Ltd 



i3«sp«1ch Id: 

Name: 



4 , 

5 , 

Cheque No for E 

Please debit my credit card ACCES&VLSA No 

Phons ordsri wikiimpi on 071-632 64S8. Signed 



enclosed. 



Artdr«s 



SPECIALISTS IN MICROCOMPUTERS AND SOFTWARE 
1 19 JOHN BRIGHT STREfcT. BIRMINGHAM Bl IBE 
TflPpphonfl- Kl S3? &4&S